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Is it possible that Higgs is a force carrier?

  1. Dec 19, 2014 #1
    Every gauge boson is within a field and carries a force. Higgs is a scalar (spin 0) boson. I am not sure which category a graviton (spin 2) would fit into, but it surely would carry a force. Is it possible that Higgs carries a force that we have not recognized yet?
     
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  3. Dec 19, 2014 #2

    ShayanJ

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    Not all bosons are gauge bosons. Just all gauge bosons are elementary bosons. But we have composite bosons too. Now Higgs is a fundamental boson but not a gauge boson.By definition, its gauge bosons which are the carriers of forces.
     
  4. Dec 19, 2014 #3

    Vanadium 50

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    The Higgs does carry a force but it is weak and short ranged. The Higgs component of the force between two electrons an Angstrom apart will be much smaller that 10-one million of the electromagnetic force. You'll never measure it.
     
  5. Dec 19, 2014 #4

    ShayanJ

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    That's very strange to me. I always thought that only the particles that come from the quantization of gauge fields, are carriers of forces, and also thought that all forces in SM are thought to be consequences of symmetries. But I never heard of Higgs field as a gauge field coming from demand of symmetry w.r.t. a particular kind of transformation. I'm really surprised and confused. Can you give some references?
     
  6. Dec 19, 2014 #5
    The higgs field is coupled to a bunch of stuff in the standard model. I guess the coupling constants are just small or something. Not too sure myself.
     
  7. Dec 19, 2014 #6

    Vanadium 50

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    Just write down the Feynman diagram ee -- H -- ee, take a look at the amplitude, and write down the equivalent classical force. This is essentially what Yukawa did.
     
  8. Dec 20, 2014 #7

    ShayanJ

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    Of course, when you say force, you don't mean the same thing as in the four fundamental forces, right? In fact, I don't see in what sense you say Higgs exerts a force.
     
  9. Dec 20, 2014 #8

    atyy

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  10. Dec 20, 2014 #9
    Vanadium explained exactly sense the Higgs exerts a force. Like he said, you can look at the first order interaction between, say, electrons mediated by the Higgs and then work out the classical limit. When you do this with the photon to first order, you get Coulomb's law. You'd get a similar classical force between electrons due to the Higgs, but as has been pointed out, it's very, very weak.
     
  11. Dec 20, 2014 #10

    Vanadium 50

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    By "force" I mean the thing you would measure if you used a very, very accurate spring scale. As far as whether this is part of the electroweak force or gets its own name, well, those are just words.
     
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