Is the block moving in an Atwood machine when climbing up a rope?

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving a massless rope and frictionless pulley, with a block of equal mass on the other side. The question is whether the block will move when the person attached to the rope climbs a distance d. The relevant equation for this problem is F=ma, and there is a request for clarification on the provided images of handwritten work. The thread is then closed, with a reminder to post equations in the thread and provide explanations and definitions of variables.
  • #1
jk494
11
1

Homework Statement


[/B]

As stated in the included pics, you are climbing up a massless rope on a frictionless pulley, attached to a block equal to your mass which is hanging on the other side. You move a distance d along the rope. Does the block move? If so, how much?

Homework Equations


F = ma

The Attempt at a Solution


My attached work
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_2018-08-23 Challenge Problems Concept of Force - MIT8_01SC_problems07 pdf.png
    Screenshot_2018-08-23 Challenge Problems Concept of Force - MIT8_01SC_problems07 pdf.png
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  • Screenshot_2018-08-24 soln pdf.png
    Screenshot_2018-08-24 soln pdf.png
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  • image1.JPG
    image1.JPG
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Last edited:
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  • #2
all of your attached images are too small to be readable
 
  • #3
phinds said:
all of your attached images are too small to be readable
I replaced them. Are these better?
 
  • #4
jk494 said:
I replaced them. Are these better?
The first one is now readable. The 2nd one still not. I'm an old guy. Maybe some of our younger members will be able to. Also, you REALLY shouldn't post chicken-scratch handwritten solutions. Typed-in work is the order of the day here.
 
  • #5
@jk494 as @phinds has said, you need to post your work as equations in the thread. Attached images of handwritten work are not acceptable.
 
  • #6
jk494 said:
I replaced them. Are these better?
My problem is not the readability but the lack of explanation.
No definition of variables, no text to explain the starting equations in terms of elementary principles or how equations are combined, and the tabular layout robs it of clues as to the logical flow.
 

1. How does an Atwood machine work?

An Atwood machine is a simple device used to demonstrate the principles of classical mechanics. It consists of two masses connected by a string or rope that passes over a pulley. The difference in the masses creates a net force, causing the system to accelerate.

2. What is the equation for calculating the acceleration of an Atwood machine?

The equation for the acceleration of an Atwood machine is a = (m1 - m2)g / (m1 + m2), where m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects and g is the acceleration due to gravity.

3. How does the acceleration change if the masses are equal?

If the masses are equal, the acceleration of the Atwood machine will be zero because there is no difference in the masses to create a net force.

4. What happens to the acceleration if one of the masses is increased?

If one of the masses is increased, the acceleration of the Atwood machine will also increase, as there is a greater difference in mass to create a larger net force.

5. How does the angle of the string affect the acceleration of an Atwood machine?

The angle of the string does not affect the acceleration of an Atwood machine, as long as the string remains taut and does not slip off the pulley. The acceleration is solely determined by the difference in masses and the force of gravity.

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