Is the E Field Direction Downward for a Ring with Continuous Polarization?

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In summary, the formula for calculating the electric field (E) is E = k * Q / r^2, where k is the Coulomb's constant (9 * 10^9 N * m^2 / C^2), Q is the magnitude of the charge in Coulombs, and r is the distance from the charge in meters. The direction of the electric field (E) is in the direction that a positive test charge would experience a force, and it can be negative, indicating an opposite direction to that of a positive test charge. The unit of measurement for the electric field (E) is newtons per coulomb (N/C), and the strength of the electric field (E) decreases as the distance from
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O.J.
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a ring whose upper half is continuously + and lower half is continuously - at a point P a distance d from the centre. Now our instructer solved it for us pointing that the direction of the field is downwards. but I am not convinced, because although the sine is contant, each time to move dTHETA u have a component in the z direction, while the magnitude we found was assigned a y direction only...:(:(
 
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any ideas?
 
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I would first like to commend you for questioning and seeking clarification on this topic. It is important to fully understand scientific concepts and not simply accept them without proper reasoning.

In regards to the direction of the electric field for a ring with continuous polarization, it is important to consider the overall net effect of the electric field at a point. While it is true that there may be components in the z direction as the distance dTHETA is changed, the overall direction of the electric field will still be downwards.

This is because the electric field is a vector quantity and its direction is determined by the net effect of all the contributing components. In this case, the magnitude of the electric field in the y direction may be greater, but the contribution from the z direction will still result in a net downward direction.

Furthermore, the direction of the electric field is also determined by the direction of the electric dipole moment, which in this case is downwards due to the continuous polarization of the ring.

In conclusion, while it is important to consider all contributing components, the overall direction of the electric field for a ring with continuous polarization will still be downwards. I hope this explanation helps to clarify any doubts you may have.
 

1. What is the formula for calculating the electric field (E) for a given charge?

The formula for calculating the electric field (E) is E = k * Q / r^2, where k is the Coulomb's constant (9 * 10^9 N * m^2 / C^2), Q is the magnitude of the charge in Coulombs, and r is the distance from the charge in meters.

2. How does the direction of the electric field (E) relate to the direction of the force on a positive charge?

The direction of the electric field (E) is in the direction that a positive test charge would experience a force. Therefore, the direction of the electric field is the same as the direction of the force on a positive charge.

3. Can the electric field (E) be negative?

Yes, the electric field (E) can be negative. A negative electric field indicates that the direction of the electric field is opposite to that of a positive test charge. This means that a negative test charge would experience a force in the opposite direction of a positive charge.

4. What is the unit of measurement for the electric field (E)?

The unit of measurement for the electric field (E) is newtons per coulomb (N/C).

5. How does the distance from a charge affect the strength of the electric field (E)?

The strength of the electric field (E) decreases as the distance from a charge increases. This is because the electric field follows an inverse square law, meaning that the electric field strength is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the charge.

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