Is there a critical pressure for melting ice?

  • Thread starter Conrad S
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  • #1
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I know the specific volume for Ice is higher than water so increases in pressure make it more favorable for the ice to go to water (hence a negative slope on a phase diagram rather than positive)

Is there a point at which if the pressure was so high that it would be have to be liquid no matter what the temperature was?

Is this even theoretically possible?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #4
Doug Huffman
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I took your question to be
Is there a point at which if the pressure was so high that it would be have to be liquid no matter what the temperature was? Is this even theoretically possible?
High temperature and high pressure make a supercritical fluid, with which i have a bit of experience. I'll have to think about a solid.
 
  • #5
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so that kind of opens up another question, so a supercritical fluid is when the the temperature and pressure are above the critical point, but at the top right of the phase diagram there is still a region where there are solids. Is is possible to have a supercritical fluid that is in the solid phase region?
or does that solid liquid line curve up really fast?
 

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