Is there a Europe equivalent to the Physics GRE?

In summary, there is an exam which must be passed at the end of school in order to be admitted to a physics or math program in Europe. This exam is not required in the US.
  • #1
messlesskess
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Is there a qualification undergrad engineers can take during university to show their aptitude for physics and maths? Like a recognised test, aptitude test that they can put in their academic record as well? Anything along these lines at all? Is there one that is recognised in UK, Europe and other countries? Thanks very much!
 
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  • #2
The Physics GRE comes to mind, but I don’t know why you’d take it unless you apply to physics grad school.
 
  • #4
Really there is nothing else is this whole wide world? Apart from GRE?
 
  • #5
It's not really clear what you're looking for here. No one is going to bestow a "physics qualification" on you for taking a single exam. The way you demonstrate this aptitude is by completing a degree in physics.

Why do you want this? If you're interested in grad school you could try contacting the departments you're interested in applying to and find out what they would specifically require from an applicant in your position.
 
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  • #6
messlesskess said:
Really there is nothing else is this whole wide world? Apart from GRE?
Why did you not address my question about competitions? I would look very favorably on a resume that I was reviewing that mentioned participating in such competitions (especially if you could link to how well you did)...
 
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  • #7
Engineers get a better break than physicists. Engineers are allowed to take the Physics GRE. Physicists are not allowed to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam unless they graduate with an engineering exam from a ABET accredited school. Don't complain
 
  • #8
Or something even slightly similar?
 
  • #10
I just simply want to know if there is a similar exam in Europe.
 
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  • #11
I think this depends on the country. In my country (Sweden), students are admitted to university programs based on high-school performance (grades) or performance on a general national test. There are also some natural science and engineering programs admitting students based on a special math and physics test arranged by the universities.
 
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  • #12
messlesskess said:
I just simply want to know if there is a similar exam in Europe.

If none of the universities require the GRE and none other is mentioned in the admissions then I'd say there isn't an equivalent one. It could be a great business op for GRE though if they could convince the European community to adopt one. :-)
 
  • #13
Here we have an exam which must be passed at the end of school. Then you're allowed to study anything, but if you failed, then you're not permitted. This makes it a bit difficult for foreign students, because they don't have this grade, which means that there are special requirements in place for them, which heavily depends on where you're from. E.g. an ordinary US-HS certificate will be useless, but I assume a French exam would do as it is comparable.
 

1. What is the purpose of the Physics GRE?

The Physics GRE (Graduate Record Examination) is a standardized test used by many graduate schools to evaluate the readiness and potential of applicants for graduate programs in physics. It assesses students' knowledge and understanding of fundamental principles and concepts in physics.

2. Is there an equivalent test for graduate programs in Europe?

Yes, there is an equivalent test for graduate programs in Europe called the GRE Physics Subject Test. This test is offered by the same organization as the Physics GRE and covers similar topics and concepts.

3. Do European graduate schools require applicants to take the GRE Physics Subject Test?

It depends on the specific graduate program and school. Some may require it, while others may have different admissions criteria. It is important to research the requirements of each program you are interested in applying to.

4. How does the GRE Physics Subject Test differ from the Physics GRE?

The GRE Physics Subject Test is similar to the Physics GRE in terms of content, but it may have slightly different question formats and difficulty levels. It also covers a broader range of topics, including classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and more.

5. Can I take the GRE Physics Subject Test instead of the Physics GRE for graduate programs in the US?

It is best to check with the specific graduate programs you are interested in to see if they accept the GRE Physics Subject Test in place of the Physics GRE. Some programs may have a preference for one test over the other, so it is important to research and plan accordingly.

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