Is this easy charge problem correct?

  • Thread starter fallen186
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Charge
In summary, the problem involves three charges located at specific coordinates and the forces acting on each charge are being calculated using the equation F=k*((q1)(q2)/r2). The y forces on the charge of 2.6 µC are being calculated through the use of trigonometric functions and the result is +0.2 N. There was a discrepancy in the angle used in the calculation, with the correct angle being 26.56 degrees.
  • #1
fallen186
41
0

Homework Statement


-----------------------------------------
A charge of -1.0 µC is located at the origin, a second charge of 2.6 µC is located at x = 0, y = 0.1 m, and a third charge of 13 µC is located at x = 0.2 m, y = 0. Find the forces that act on each of the three charges.
I need to find the y forces on the charge 2.6 µC. I have one last try.

Homework Equations


-----------------------------------------
F=k*((q1)(q2)/r2)
K = 9E9 Nm2/c2
q1= charge 1 in columbs
q2 = charge 2 in columbs
r = distance between the two charges (in meters)

a2 + b2 = c2
sin(xº)=O/H

#1E#2 = #1*10^#2

The Attempt at a Solution


-----------------------------------------
F1 = 9E9 * ((2.6µC)*( -1.0µC))/.12
F1 = -2.34 N
*It's negative because its being pulled down due to attraction

F2 = 9E9 * ((2.6µC)*( 13.0µC))/.2242
F2 = 5.6 N
**.1m2 +.2m2 =.05 , .05.5 = .224m **
**.1m and hyptonuse angle: sin-1(.2m/.224) = 63.23º **
** Other angle is 26.76º (90º-63.23º)**
sin(xº)=O/H --> H*sin(xº)=O
5.6 N sin (26.76º) = +2.54 N

+2.54 N - 2.34 N = +.2 N
Is this the correct answer? +.2N
------------------------------------
I tried using 5.6cos(26.56º) = 5.009N (Hcos(xº) = A) for the x forces and it told me I was wrong. I plugged in 5 N & -5 N :|
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
The physics looks good. I didn't check the calculator work, except for the angle - and I got 26.56 degrees instead of your 26.76 degrees. Better check that again. Use tan instead of sin so you don't get any rounding error due to the hypotenuse calc.
 
  • #3


I cannot confirm if the answer provided is correct without knowing the context and assumptions made. However, I can provide some feedback on the approach used.

Firstly, it is important to clearly state the units used for all values. In this case, it seems like the units for charge are in microcoulombs (µC), but the units for distance are not specified.

Secondly, the equations used for calculating the forces are correct, but it is important to use the correct values for the distances between the charges. In this case, the distance between charge 1 and charge 2 is 0.1 m, not 0.12 m. Similarly, the distance between charge 2 and charge 3 is 0.2 m, not 0.2242 m.

Additionally, it is important to use the correct signs for the charges. In this case, charge 1 and charge 2 have opposite signs, so the force between them should be negative, indicating attraction. However, the force between charge 2 and charge 3 should be positive, as they have the same sign and would repel each other.

Lastly, the approach for finding the y forces is not entirely clear. It seems like the attempt was to use trigonometry to find the y component of the force, but it is not clear how the values for the angles were obtained. It is important to use the correct angles and signs for the forces in order to get the correct answer.

In conclusion, while the overall approach seems correct, there are some errors in the values used and the approach for finding the y forces. It may be helpful to double check the values and equations used, and to clearly show the calculations and assumptions made.
 

Related to Is this easy charge problem correct?

1. Is this easy charge problem correct?

The answer to this question depends on the specific easy charge problem in question. It is important to carefully read and follow the instructions for the problem to ensure accuracy.

2. How do I know if my solution to the easy charge problem is correct?

The best way to determine if your solution is correct is to check your work step by step and compare it to the given answer or solution. It can also be helpful to ask a colleague or teacher to review your work.

3. Are there any common mistakes to avoid when solving easy charge problems?

Some common mistakes include using the wrong formula, forgetting to convert units, or making calculation errors. It is important to carefully review your work and double check any calculations.

4. Can I use a calculator to solve easy charge problems?

Yes, you can use a calculator to solve easy charge problems. However, it is important to make sure that you are using the correct functions and entering the numbers correctly to avoid any errors.

5. Are there any tips for solving easy charge problems more efficiently?

Some tips for solving easy charge problems more efficiently include organizing your work and equations, double checking your units, and rounding to the appropriate number of significant figures. It can also be helpful to practice and familiarize yourself with common formulas and techniques for solving these types of problems.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
10K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
7K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
8K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
6K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
16
Views
32K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
19K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
5K
Back
Top