Jobs and salary for Mathematics and Physics addict students.

In summary, the person is seeking advice on what major to pursue in undergraduate studies to ensure a high salary. They have listed their current subjects of interest and have mentioned that they enjoy mathematics. Suggestions have been given to consider engineering, medical physics, and other fields related to physics and mathematics. However, it is also mentioned that pursuing a career solely for a high salary may not be the best approach and the person may want to consider other fields such as law or accountancy.
  • #1
ishtiaque.tg
3
0
Hi guys n gals,

I am new here. I am about to finish my 11th grade/ GCE AS Level Exams. I have Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Further Mathematics and Applied ICT. What major should I take in my undergraduate course to ensure a (very) high salary.

Thank you and hoping for a quick reply pleasezzzzzzzzzzzzz!

P.S: Mechatronics is good but i don't know if Mathematics is of importance in this subject.

N.B: I love Mathematics :)
 
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  • #2
ishtiaque.tg said:
Hi guys n gals,

I am new here. I am about to finish my 11th grade/ GCE AS Level Exams. I have Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Further Mathematics and Applied ICT. What major should I take in my undergraduate course to ensure a (very) high salary.

Thank you and hoping for a quick reply pleasezzzzzzzzzzzzz!

P.S: Mechatronics is good but i don't know if Mathematics is of importance in this subject.

N.B: I love Mathematics :)

Mathematics is proof based, not applied. If you have not seen proof based math, then you are in no condition to say you love math. College math will all be proofs, just like geometry if you did that.

A high salary can only be achieved if you excel in your field, so choose something you love doing and the money will come naturally. Having said that, physics, math, and chemistry are academic disciplines - so you will never ensure a very high salary. As a general rule, if you want money DO NOT GO INTO ACADEMIA. Engineering, financial math, and the more applied fields are more employable and as such guarantee a higher paycheque.
 
  • #3
It's not so much the subject that ensures a high salary, rather, what you do with it.

Naturally, it's wise to pursue in university the subjects that you enjoy in high school. But often students find that their interests change as they move through higher education. Subjects get more competative, topics are covered with much more depth and rigour, and a certain amount of knowledge always seems to be "assumed" - whether or not the students actually have it. I believe that the best way to address this is to start out with a general flexible program that will keep as many doors open as possible.
 
  • #4
You could get a B.S. in physics with a postgraduate degree in medical physics. Medical physicists make damn good money.
 
  • #5
Brian_C said:
You could get a B.S. in physics with a postgraduate degree in medical physics. Medical physicists make damn good money.

Hey, I do not have biology. I have never studied Biology. Would it be possible for me to enter this career?

Moreover, what are your views about turbine engineers, etc.?
 
  • #6
You can read about the prerequisites for the medical physics program at the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at the link below. They only require two semesters of biology for admission to the Ph.D program, and none for the M.S. program. You have plenty of time to take those classes since you haven't even started college.

http://www.uth.tmc.edu/gsbs/programs/medphys/
 
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  • #7
study law or accountancy
 
  • #8
Brian_C said:
You can read about the prerequisites for the medical physics program at the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at the link below. They only require two semesters of biology for admission to the Ph.D program, and none for the M.S. program. You have plenty of time to take those classes since you haven't even started college.

http://www.uth.tmc.edu/gsbs/programs/medphys/

Hey, Hi,

Actually mate, I do not have the slightest interest in Biology. I do not like anything about this subject (no offence).I would really like to study anything that is closely related to physics and mathematics and also earn as much as possible.

Someone please help me out :S
 
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  • #9
ishtiaque.tg said:
I would really like to study anything that is closely related to physics and mathematics and also earn as much as possible.

Someone please help me out.

You don't know what you're asking for so you can't be helped. Physics and math have to be approached on their own terms -- not with a view to a fat paycheck. If you're thinking about the fat paycheck at the end, you won't be able to focus on the math and physics.

From what you've written, I would advise you to stay away from the exact sciences. As someone has already suggested, look at accountancy or law.
 

1. What types of jobs are available for students with a Mathematics and Physics background?

There are a variety of jobs available for students with expertise in Mathematics and Physics. Some common job titles include data analyst, financial analyst, research scientist, software engineer, and aerospace engineer.

2. Are there any specific industries that prefer to hire Mathematics and Physics students?

Many industries value the skills and knowledge of Mathematics and Physics students, including technology, finance, engineering, and research. However, there are also opportunities in fields such as healthcare, government, and education.

3. How does the salary for Mathematics and Physics jobs compare to other fields?

The salary for Mathematics and Physics jobs tends to be higher than average, due to the high demand for individuals with these skills. However, salaries can vary depending on the specific job, industry, and location.

4. What level of education is required for jobs in Mathematics and Physics?

Most jobs in Mathematics and Physics require at least a bachelor's degree, with many positions requiring a master's or doctoral degree. In addition to formal education, hands-on experience and strong analytical skills are also important for success in these fields.

5. How can Mathematics and Physics students increase their job prospects and salary potential?

Students can increase their job prospects and salary potential by gaining practical experience through internships or research opportunities, networking with professionals in their desired field, and continuously developing their skills through further education or certifications.

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