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Kinetic Work Energy Theorem

  1. Mar 30, 2014 #1
    When does the Kinetic Work Energy Theorem not apply to a situation? Or better, is there a general form of the equation where work can equal the change in any energy? What is work besides a force and a distance?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 31, 2014 #2
    The Work-Energy Theorem only applies to rigid bodies. That is, if the work is not used to deform the object.

    There's a thread here that discusses this in detail;
    http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/58134/how-to-understand-the-work-energy-theorem

    Work by definition, is what a force does on an object by displacing it. However, there are other ways of representing work if that's what you're asking.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2014
  4. Mar 31, 2014 #3

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Here's something that I wrote in another thread that may clarify how the "work"-energy theorem, when thought of as an application of Newton's 2nd law, may be applied to deformable bodies.
     
  5. Mar 31, 2014 #4
    How can work be done to an object that has a change in potential energy, but no change in velocity?
     
  6. Apr 1, 2014 #5

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    If the velocity doesn't change, the work-kinetic energy theorem just says that the net work must be zero. You do work when you lift an object at constant speed, but gravity is also doing negative work.
     
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