Le Sage Gravity - some questions

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In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of "Le Sage" gravity and its validity, with questions raised about the bending of light and the drag effect. The conversation also mentions the idea of using spacetime curvature to explain the same effects as Le Sage gravity without the need for particles. However, the theory has been falsified and there is a new thread on the topic.
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Ad_Absurdum
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"Le Sage" Gravity - some questions

In "pushing" gravity of the "Le Sage" kind, caused by some type of low mass particles,

1. Would light still be bent by gravity?

2. Would the light be dispersed (each frequency bent to a different extent), thus differentiating it from the bending caused by curved space?Thanks in advance!

:smile:
 
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Since Le Sage gravity has been falsified already (i.e. shown to be inconsistent with experiment) why would one care? The Wikipedia has some references to the (very early, 17th century) articles when Le Sage gravity was still considered interesting (i.e. it hadn't been falsified yet.) However, I doubt that they knew enough about the properties of light to have a definitive prediction.
 
  • #3
pervect said:
Since Le Sage gravity has been falsified already (i.e. shown to be inconsistent with experiment) why would one care? The Wikipedia has some references to the (very early, 17th century) articles when Le Sage gravity was still considered interesting (i.e. it hadn't been falsified yet.) However, I doubt that they knew enough about the properties of light to have a definitive prediction.

Would the drag effect that doomed Le Sage gravity still be an issue if instead of the all-pervasive corpuscles he mentions, you had spacetime in the absence of mass be curved in the opposite way that we now assume it is around mass? Then mass would shield it by "uncurving" spacetime. You'd have the same effect as Le Sage but there are no particles pushing to cause drag. It's just the shape of the universe that does the pushing. It would be like spacetime is a plateau above the minimum (zero spacetime curvature) and mass creates valleys in it that can only go as deep as the minimum (a black hole). But that seems to me to be indistinguishable from Einstein's view to me as far as the observed results. Only what would this version say about singularities? They don't have infinite gravitation, but instead have 100% "uncurving".

I'm probably completely off on some obvious thing but I don't know what it is - so don't flame me. I just want to know what's wrong with this idea.
 
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  • #4
I don't understand the sudden resurgence in interest in LeSage theory, which has (as I mentioned) been falsified.

Since this is a necropost (reopening a very old post), and we already have a new thread on LeSage gravity under another name, I'm locking this thread.
 

Related to Le Sage Gravity - some questions

1. What is Le Sage Gravity?

Le Sage Gravity is an alternative theory of gravity proposed by Georges-Louis Le Sage in the 18th century. It suggests that gravity is caused by a flux of tiny particles constantly bombarding all objects in the universe.

2. How does Le Sage Gravity differ from Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation?

Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation states that objects with mass attract each other with a force directly proportional to their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Le Sage Gravity, on the other hand, proposes that gravity is caused by the collision of tiny particles, rather than the direct attraction of masses.

3. Is Le Sage Gravity a widely accepted theory?

No, Le Sage Gravity is not a widely accepted theory in the scientific community. While it was initially popular in the 18th and 19th centuries, it has since been largely discredited due to a lack of evidence and inconsistencies with modern physics.

4. What evidence supports or refutes Le Sage Gravity?

There is currently no solid evidence to support Le Sage Gravity. While it was initially proposed to explain the constant acceleration of objects in a vacuum, modern experiments have shown that this can be explained by other factors such as the curvature of spacetime.

5. What are the potential implications of Le Sage Gravity if it were proven to be true?

If Le Sage Gravity were proven to be true, it would completely change our understanding of gravity and the laws of physics. It could also have implications for other theories, such as general relativity, which would need to be revised to accommodate this new understanding of gravity.

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