Learn VSEPR Theory: Carbon & Oxygen Bonding

In summary, the conversation discusses learning about Valence bond theory and VSEPR theory in chemistry. The speaker is struggling to understand how carbon and oxygen can form a triple bond in the molecule CO, given that carbon only has four valence electrons. They ask for help and are advised to draw out the orbitals on an energy diagram to better understand the bond formation.
  • #1
Maz88
10
0
okay so I am learning the Valence bond theory and the VSEPR theory in chemistry. and so far its been going well.
but i don't understand how carbon and oxygen combine together forming a triple boond creating CO (carbon monoxide) because we only have 4 valence carbon electrons so how can it form a triple bond with 2 lone pairs ? please help :)
 
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  • #2
can someone pleaseee help mee !
 
  • #3
Since carbon's valence shell looks like 2s2, 2p2 and your p-orbital can have 3 pairs of e- (6 e-) that means you can gain up to 4- to complete its valance shell.

Try drawing out your orbitals on energy diagram for the bond (with the hybridized orbitals) and filling it in.
 

Related to Learn VSEPR Theory: Carbon & Oxygen Bonding

1. What is VSEPR theory?

VSEPR theory stands for Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion theory. It is a model used in chemistry to predict the shape of a molecule based on the arrangement of its atoms and valence electrons.

2. Why is VSEPR theory important?

VSEPR theory helps chemists understand the shape and properties of molecules, which is essential in determining their reactivity and behavior in chemical reactions. It also allows for the prediction of molecular polarity, which affects a molecule's physical properties.

3. How does VSEPR theory apply to carbon and oxygen bonding?

VSEPR theory applies to carbon and oxygen bonding by determining the shape of the molecule based on the arrangement of the atoms and lone pairs of electrons around the central carbon atom. For example, in carbon dioxide (CO2), the carbon atom is surrounded by two oxygen atoms, each with two lone pairs of electrons, resulting in a linear molecular shape.

4. What are the different molecular shapes possible for carbon and oxygen compounds?

Some common molecular shapes for carbon and oxygen compounds include linear, trigonal planar, bent, and tetrahedral. The specific shape of a molecule depends on the number of atoms and lone pairs of electrons around the central carbon atom.

5. How is VSEPR theory used in real-world applications?

VSEPR theory is used in many real-world applications, such as drug design, material science, and environmental studies. For example, understanding the shape of a molecule can help predict its biological activity, and knowing the polarity of a molecule can determine its solubility in different environments.

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