Linearity of time evolution in classical mechanics

In summary, the conversation discusses the linearity of time evolution in classical mechanics. It is noted that for the important case of harmonic oscillators, linear equations of motion can be obtained. The equation of motion for harmonic oscillators is given, along with its components such as external force, damping, and eigenfrequency. It is also mentioned that this equation is often a good approximation for bound motion around the minimum of a more complicated potential. The concept of linearity is further explained, with the harmonic oscillator being a standard and important example. It is concluded that the harmonic oscillator is a good approximation for any conservative system around its stable equilibrium.
  • #1
Anupama
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I came to know that time evolution in classical mechanics is highly non linear. Is there any case that it become linear?
 
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  • #2
You get linear equations of motion for the important case of harmonic oscillators. The EoM reads
$$m \ddot{x}+2 m \gamma \dot{x}+m\omega^2 x=F,$$
where ##F=F(t)## is an external force, ##\gamma## the damping, and ##\omega## the eigenfrequency of the (undamped) oscillator.

It's among the most simple equations of state, and you should carefully study its solutions. It's often a good approximation for the bound motion around the minimum of a more complicated potential, if the deviation from this stable fix point doesn't become too large (small amplitudes of oscillations).
 
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  • #3
Well, linearity is ensured if you can define a potential ##V## such that ##L=T-V## and this potential is at most quadratic in ##x##.
As stated in the post above, the (possibly driven and damped) harmonic oscillator is the standard (and probably the most important) example, since every potential can be written locally around its minimum as a quadratic potential (Taylor series). Hence, the harmonic oscillator is a good approximation for any (conservative) system around its stable equilibrium.
If you later on study quantum mechanics, you will also come across the harmonic oscillator several times.
 
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Related to Linearity of time evolution in classical mechanics

1. What is linearity of time evolution in classical mechanics?

Linearity of time evolution in classical mechanics refers to the principle that the behavior of a system can be described by a set of linear equations, where the output is a linear function of the input. In other words, the system's evolution over time can be accurately predicted by its initial conditions and the laws of classical mechanics.

2. Why is linearity important in classical mechanics?

Linearity is important in classical mechanics because it allows us to predict the behavior of a system over time with a high degree of accuracy. This is particularly useful in many real-world applications, such as predicting the trajectory of a projectile or the motion of planets in the solar system.

3. How does linearity relate to the principle of superposition?

The principle of superposition states that the overall response of a system to multiple inputs is equal to the sum of the individual responses to each input. This is directly related to linearity, as a system that exhibits linearity will also exhibit the principle of superposition. In other words, the linear behavior of a system allows us to combine and analyze individual inputs to predict the overall response.

4. Can a system exhibit non-linearity in classical mechanics?

Yes, a system can exhibit non-linearity in classical mechanics. This typically occurs when the equations governing the system's behavior are non-linear, meaning that the output is not a simple linear function of the input. Non-linearity can lead to more complex and unpredictable behavior in a system, making it more difficult to accurately predict its evolution over time.

5. How does the concept of linearity in classical mechanics differ from quantum mechanics?

In classical mechanics, linearity refers to the relationship between input and output quantities, where the output is a linear function of the input. In quantum mechanics, linearity refers to the mathematical framework of quantum mechanics, where the state of a system is described by a linear combination of all possible states. While both classical and quantum mechanics have the concept of linearity, they differ in their mathematical formulations and the types of systems they can accurately describe.

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