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Literature on Astrophysics

  1. Jul 17, 2008 #1
    Hello, I'm new to these forums so I don't really know if I'm posting this in the right spot, but I was wondering if I could get some suggestions on books to read on Astrophysics. I've been reading a couple books on String Theory by Brian Greene and a couple books by Michio Kaku, but I would really like to get more into the depth of Astrophysics in a few other books. I would also like to say, nothing too complicated, something for a new person looking into Astrophysics. Thanks
     
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  3. Jul 17, 2008 #2

    cristo

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    I think you'll need to be more specific: are you looking for popular science books, similar to the ones you name here, or do you want technical books on astrophysics. I'm not sure that I know of any that fall into the latter category...
     
  4. Jul 17, 2008 #3

    Kurdt

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    Zeilik's "Introductory Astronomy and Astrophysics" should be a fairly small step up from Pop. sci. books.
     
  5. Jul 17, 2008 #4
    Freedman and Kaufmann's "Universe" textbook would be good. It is predominantly conceptual in nature and covers a lot of topics. You should be able to find older editions for a few bucks.
     
  6. Jul 17, 2008 #5
    In response to your reply, I am looking for more technical books on Astrophysics. I am really looking to learn new astrophysics for later on in my schooling.
     
  7. Jul 17, 2008 #6
    If your looking for a book that uses mathematics extensively, I recommend "An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics" by Carroll and Ostlie. They came out with a new edition within the past year, so it is a little pricey but older editions may be cheaper.
     
  8. Jul 17, 2008 #7
    Maybe not exactly what you are searching for, but you can download it for free, so why not have a look at it:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/0706.1988

    Lecture notes on Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology for undergrades. Some of the equations are too hard for a newbie, just skip them and read the text.
     
  9. Jul 17, 2008 #8
    nice, thank you
     
  10. Jul 21, 2008 #9
    McTrastico - I was at the same level with you. Plans of pursuing physics/astrophysics as a career - read I guess "laymen" physics/ astrophysics books - wanted something deeper but not too complex for one without a degree in the field?
    Try Feynman's Lectures - He's interesting and from what I hear he is must read for some undergraduate physics majors in college.
    Also read Stephen Hawking's A Brief History Of Time - similar to what Greene did in The Elegant Universe - but a little more complex.
    Another book that fits what you want - The Road To Reality by Roger Penrose
    If you have access to science journals, then Astrophysical Journal would be a given.
    You would also be surprised at how many essays with varying degrees of complexity on astrophysics or related fields are on the web. A simple search would give you a plethora of information.
    Hope this helps.
     
  11. Jul 22, 2008 #10
    I just want to say that that was a very helpful reply, I'm in the middle of reading The Elegant Universe, and about to start on A Brief History of Time afterwards, and a quick question, If I read some online essays, would It really help when I take the astronomy and physics courses in school?
     
  12. Jul 22, 2008 #11

    cristo

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    I would be very careful when choosing articles to read online: there is a lot more nonsense out there than there is real science.
     
  13. Jul 22, 2008 #12

    Astronuc

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    Perhaps this would be of interest -

    The Unsolved Universe: Challenges for the Future: JENAM 2002 (Hardcover)
    by Mário J.P.F.G. Monteiro (Editor)
    https://www.amazon.com/Unsolved-Universe-Challenges-Future-JENAM/dp/1402016735/

    Robert Trotta's homepage at Cambridge might also be of interest
    http://www-astro.physics.ox.ac.uk/~rxt/


    With regard to on-line essays, one might wish to peruse the bibliographies of publications of university faculty members which have been published in peer review journals.
     
  14. Jul 22, 2008 #13

    malawi_glenn

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    Freedman and Kaufmann's "Universe" textbook & "An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics" by Carroll and Ostlie.

    Are my tips, 1st book is loot of nice pictures and phenomelogical, second is approx 1400 pages, only B&W pictures, and lots of lots of math.
     
  15. Jul 22, 2008 #14

    Kurdt

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    I also Kaufman's "Universe" and would like to echo the sentiments of others about being careful with online articles.
     
  16. Jul 26, 2008 #15

    Astronuc

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    Here is a good list on Stellar Astrophysics.

    http://www.shef.ac.uk/physics/people/vdhillon/teaching/phy213/phy213_texts.html [Broken]

    some useful links

    http://www.shef.ac.uk/physics/people/vdhillon/teaching/phy213/phy213_links.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2017
  17. Aug 21, 2008 #16
    The Stars: their structure and evolution
    R. J. Tayler (Cambridge University Press)

    Great book! I read it many moons ago for a second year astronomy course. One of the best textbooks I encountered, almost up there with Feynman. Read Feynman's lectures on physics first, to get the necessary Maths & Physics background. You need to put the physics (and some maths) into astro to advance.
     
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