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I Lorentz transformation of the Gravitational constant

  1. Jun 2, 2017 #1
    Since force is transformed via: F'x= Fx ; F'y= Fy/ ϒ; F'z=Fz/ ϒ

    (F' is the force related to the moving frame, F is the force on the rest frame and ϒ=1/√1-v2/c2 ).


    I expect that G (Gravitational constant) will be transformed between moving and rest frame in order to satisfy force transformation since

    F=-Gm1m2/r2


    Can you please refer me to a paper or text book on that specific topic?


    It is posable to see that substituting the mass Lorentz transformation m=moϒ and Lorentz-FitzGerald's contraction - ro/ϒ without applying a transformation on G, do not settle the force to get the force transformation like. Instead it gets F'=-Gm1m2 ϒ3/r2. Namely F'=F ϒ3.


    Can you please refer me to a paper or text book on that specific topic?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 2, 2017 #2

    Dale

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    Newtonian gravity is not compatible with relativity.
     
  4. Jun 2, 2017 #3

    Ibix

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    As Dale says, you can't tweak Newtonian gravity to make it work in relativity. The instantaneous action at a distance implicit in Newton's theory violates the "nothing travels faster than light" rule of relativity.

    If you want to understand relativistic gravity you need to learn general relativity. Sean Carroll's lecture notes are a good free online place to start.
     
  5. Jun 2, 2017 #4

    PeterDonis

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    In relativity, gravity is not a force, so this transformation law doesn't apply to gravity.
     
  6. Jun 2, 2017 #5

    Orodruin

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    He could however have made the same question about Coulomb's constant. The answer being that Coulomb's law is not consistent with relativity except for in the case of a stationary field source.
     
  7. Jun 2, 2017 #6

    PeterDonis

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    Yes, fair point.
     
  8. Jun 2, 2017 #7

    Orodruin

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