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Engineering M. Sc. in Electrical Engineering or Physics, for solid state device engineering

  1. Oct 16, 2011 #1
    I have a B. Sc. in Electrical Engineering and I would like to work with photovoltaics / solid state device physics. My undergraduate degree is not quite enough to let me work in that field outright. So I'm looking to do a graduate degree.

    I applied for a 2-year M. Sc. in Physics program and I was assessed for 2 years' worth of bridging subjects, for a total of 4 years of study. I think that 4 years is quite a long time. The good thing is that I've been talking to a professor who does condensed matter physics and photovoltaics and he's willing to let me join his group.

    On the other hand, I have an option to do a 2-year M. Sc. in EE in the field of Microelectronics or Power Electronics. Which one will be a good way to bridge into photovoltaics?

    At this university, the Physics department is the more prolific publisher of research output, both locally and internationally.

    Not that I'm super rich (or else I wouldn't be asking this question), let's take the issue of finances out of the equation. Let's focus on the time investment (I'm 25) and academic learning benefits.

    Time-wise, I'm inclined towards EE; but personally, Physics is more appealing to me. Short term, I'd like to know (with an M. Sc. in Physics) if I can compete with microelectronics engineers for solid state device engineering jobs. Long term, I'd like to do a PhD (for which I'll need publications to get into a program) in photovoltaics. My professional outlook right after finishing my M. Sc. is that I'll need to work for a while first before I can proceed to do my PhD. An industry job is preferable since it usually pays more. On the subject of publications, I will have achieved that during my stint in the M. Sc. program.

    What are your thought processes when faced with a dilemma like this? What other factors do you consider?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 17, 2011 #2
    Four years! Blimey. They must be short of money and after all the student fees they can get...
    Why not take an MSc in your exact area of interest? You are more likely to get on such a course with your degree, e.g., do this in one year(!):

    http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/course/108/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
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