Magnetic Field and a Charged Particle -- relative motion question

In summary, the conversation discusses an experiment involving a charged particle in a magnetic field and the effects of moving relative to the particle. It is determined that in the moving frame, there is also an electric field, leading to a net electromagnetic force of 0. This process is known as the Lorentz transform and is a part of the theory of relativity. Reference frames should be clearly defined for a better understanding of the experiment.
  • #1
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Here's a experiment.
There is a magnetic field vertically downward and a charged particle is kept inside it.
Simple.
Does it experience a force?
Now if we move a speed of 2m/s relative to the frame of rest charged particle. Then it must experience a force right?(Becuz now its velocity is not zero)
Can anybody explain on this thought of mine.
 
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  • #2
jha192001 said:
Here's a experiment.
There is a magnetic field vertically downward and a charged particle is kept inside it.
Simple.
Does it experience a force?
Now if we move a speed of 2m/s relative to the frame of rest charged particle. Then it must experience a force right?(Becuz now its velocity is not zero)
Can anybody explain on this thought of mine.
In the moving frame there is also an electric field. The net electromagnetic force (electric plus magnetic) remains 0 as the two parts cancel each other.
 
  • #3
What is being moved and relative to what can you please elaborate?

I understood that the magnet is being moved while the particle stays stationary or vice versa?
 
  • #4
girts said:
I understood that the magnet is being moved while the particle stays stationary or vice versa?
It is rather confusing. I understood that both magnet and particle are at rest wrt each other and that only the frame of reference is moving.
 
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  • #5
I would advise the thread author to specify the reference frames precisely otherwise these types of questions become a guessing game or the other option is to answer from all viewpoints
 
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  • #6
girts said:
I would advise the thread author to specify the reference frames precisely otherwise these types of questions become a guessing game or the other option is to answer from all viewpoints
Yes sorry. Both magnet and particle is at rest and when i talk about moving, we are moving wrt to both magnet and particle.
 
  • #7
Dale said:
It is rather confusing. I understood that both magnet and particle are at rest wrt each other and that only the frame of reference is moving.
Yes sorry. Both magnet and particle is at rest and when i talk about moving, we are moving wrt to both magnet and particle.
 
  • #8
Dale said:
In the moving frame there is also an electric field. The net electromagnetic force (electric plus magnetic) remains 0 as the two parts cancel each other.
Whats the name of this process can you elaborate or tell me the theory's name?
 

What is a magnetic field?

A magnetic field is a physical phenomenon that is created by moving electric charges. It is a region in space where a magnetic force can be detected.

How is a magnetic field created?

A magnetic field is created by moving electric charges, such as electrons, protons, or ions. These charges create a magnetic field around them as they move.

What is a charged particle?

A charged particle is an object that has an electric charge, either positive or negative. This charge can be created by gaining or losing electrons.

How does a charged particle interact with a magnetic field?

A charged particle moving through a magnetic field will experience a force known as the Lorentz force. This force is perpendicular to both the direction of the particle's motion and the direction of the magnetic field.

What is relative motion in relation to a magnetic field and a charged particle?

Relative motion refers to the movement of a charged particle in a magnetic field from the perspective of an observer. This can affect the strength and direction of the magnetic force experienced by the charged particle.

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