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Matter/antimatter collisions is now what bugs me

  1. Jan 11, 2010 #1
    First post here so sorry if I got it in the wrong spot. I'd like to say though I am very exited to have found this site. I see some sleepless nights in my very near future :wink:

    Matter/antimatter collisions, appear to me, to violate the Law of conservation of matter and energy. I suspect once we understand more about multidimensional physics we shall find the law to hold true. But hey, like my name says im the amatuer, I also suspect there could be more plausable explantion out there and I just haven't found it.

    I turmoiled over the Big Bang for a long time until I found "Inflation" ; which summarily removed my problem with the theory. Matter/antimatter collisions is now what bugs me (partial geek here I guess).
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 11, 2010 #2
    Re: Antimatter

    reading the post, my question is why does the collision not prove the law false.
     
  4. Jan 11, 2010 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Re: Antimatter

    How?

    The amount of energy released from the collision of matter and anitmatter is determined by E=mc2, i.e. complete conversion of matter to energy.
     
  5. Jan 11, 2010 #4

    Doc Al

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    Re: Antimatter

    What makes you think that such collisions would violate conservation of energy? (There's no such law as conservation of 'matter'.)
     
  6. Jan 11, 2010 #5
    Re: Antimatter

    First thanks for the reply! I guess I'm missing the bassics then. My understanding when Matter/antimatter collide, a complete annihilation occurs. Nothing left. No matter, no energy. Are you telling me the matter is gone but energy is released into the universe?
     
  7. Jan 11, 2010 #6

    Doc Al

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    Re: Antimatter

    Yes, that's one possibility. When the particles annihilate, energy is released as photons. The total energy (including rest energy of mass) is always conserved.
     
  8. Jan 11, 2010 #7
    Re: Antimatter

    Well thanks. I was thinking the energy was gone as well.

    Thanks for helping a curious amatuer, sorry if I wasted your time.
     
  9. Jan 11, 2010 #8

    DaveC426913

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    Re: Antimatter

    You are not wasting our time. We fall all over each other to answer questions such as yours.
     
  10. Jan 11, 2010 #9

    Doc Al

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    Re: Antimatter

    :rofl: Yeah, what a bunch of geeks, eh?
     
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