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Measurement problem involving scale

  1. Jan 28, 2012 #1
    A rectangular park has an area of five hectares (1 hectare = 10,000 meter square)

    The dimensions of the park on a map are 5 cm * 4 cm

    What is the scale of the map?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 28, 2012 #2

    tiny-tim

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    hi rishch :wink:

    show us what you've tried, and where you're stuck, and then we'll know how to help! :smile:
     
  4. Jan 28, 2012 #3

    Simon Bridge

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    So the map of the park has sides 5cm by 4cm
    The actual part has sides x by y
    The area of the park is xy=50000m^2 (5 hectares)
    The area of the map of the park is A=20cm^2

    What is the definition of the scale factor?
    What is the relationship between this and the area?
    What have you tried?
     
  5. Jan 28, 2012 #4
    The answer I got is 1:25,000,000. Is this correct ?
     
  6. Jan 28, 2012 #5

    tiny-tim

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    hi rishch! :wink:
    nope! :redface:

    show your reasoning (in full, including some words) :smile:
     
  7. Jan 29, 2012 #6

    Simon Bridge

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    Nobody ever answers my questions... :(

    You can check your own answer:

    a scale of 1:25000000 means that 1cm on the map is 250km IRL.
    So the park has dimensions: 1000km by 1250km ... is that right?

    This sort of reality check you don't need us for!
    The best way to use us is to explain your reasoning and then we can best show you what underlying misunderstandings you may have. That way you learn better. I know it can make you feel silly to show your wrongness in public but don't worry: we've all been through this and we understand what it is like. Better that you are valiently wrong here, where it can benefit others as well, than hide it and get it wrong in an exam or worse - in real life.
     
  8. Jan 29, 2012 #7

    tiny-tim

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    Simon :smile:, sometimes less is more! :wink:
     
  9. Jan 29, 2012 #8

    Simon Bridge

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    And the little guys try harder, eh: tiny-tim? :)
    I know - sometimes I'm too wordy for my own good.
     
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