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MOX (Plutonium-Uranium mixed Oxide) Nuclear Fuel

  1. Jan 12, 2010 #1
    Hello all,

    I just read an article in POWER magazine for this month (January 2010) that Japan is now operating a MOX-fueled reactor.

    In this article it is stated that MOX-fuel usage should be about 5% globally this year. Is that statement accurate given the small number of facilites that can produce MOX fuel?

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 12, 2010 #2

    mgb_phys

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    The countries with lots of nuclear power (France and Japan) can run mox fuel in pretty much all of the plants, I think CANDUs can also run on MOX.
     
  4. Jan 12, 2010 #3

    Xnn

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    I don't believe the 5% figure is accurate.

    MOX fuel is only about 5% Pu to begin with and the plants that do run it usually only load about a third of the core with it.

    Are there any CANDU's on MOX?
     
  5. Jan 12, 2010 #4

    Astronuc

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    It might be 5% of plants, but I'd have to read the article. MOX is usually loaded in mixed core with UO2 assemblies. A number of EU programs - primarily France and Germany are running MOX assemblies. Japan recently started MOX. MOX is typically 6-8% Pu to match the 4.0-5% U-235 equivalent. The commercial MOX uses LWR RG Pu and not WG-derived Pu.

    CANDUs have historically used natural U in UO2, but CANFLEX assemblies have been using slightly enriched U more recently.
     
  6. Jan 14, 2010 #5
    Astronuc,

    Here is a link to the magazine that contains the write up. It starts on page 8.

    The title is "Japan Launches Commercial Operation of MOX-Fueled Reactor"

    http://www.powermag-digital.com/powermag/201001_1#pg1 [Broken]

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    Thanks
    Matt
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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