My landlord wants my social security # to look at utility bills

In summary, the speaker lives in Buffalo, N.Y. in an apartment building owned by Peoples Inc. which was recently purchased from Olmsted Inc. They were recently asked for their utility account numbers and social security numbers for usage charts. However, there was a break-in at the building office and the speaker is now concerned that their personal information from their leases may have been stolen. They are also questioning the legality of the repeated requests for their social security number. The speaker has been living in the building for 16 years and pays rent on time. They are seeking advice on the situation.
  • #1
BigJim
I live in Buffalo N.Y. and our building is owned by Peoples Inc. They just purchased our apartment buildings from Olmsted Inc. last year.

We were just given letters asking for our utility account numbers and our social security numbers so they can look at our accounts when ever needed for usage charts? The buildings office downstairs was broken into this weekend and they stole the pass key to all the apartments and now I am concerned that they may have also stolen our leases with our personal information on them.

We all just filled out new leases with our social numbers 3 & 1/2 weeks ago. Its bad enough they keep doing apartment inspections every 3 weeks or so for the past year but now this. Is it legal for them to ask for my S.S.# again and again?

P.S. I have been living here for over 16 years and pay my rent on time all the time.
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF.

You really should be asking this in a legal advice or renters' advice forum. To me it makes sense that they would need your SSN, once, for a credit check before they offer you a lease. After that, they're entitled to getting paid every month, in accordance with your lease and for you to abide by the rules/policies in the lease. I wouldn't consider it reasonable to keep asking (nor would I give them) personal information including access to my utility accounts. Read your lease, google the laws in your state, ask experts in the field.

But what do I know, I'm an engineer and I haven't rented in 20 years.
 
  • #3
And as a PF policy, we cannot give legal advice. Thread is closed and we wish you well. :smile:
 

Related to My landlord wants my social security # to look at utility bills

1. Why does my landlord need my social security number to look at utility bills?

Your landlord may need your social security number to verify your identity and ensure that you are the rightful tenant living in the rental unit. They may also need it to run a credit check or background check to assess your reliability as a tenant.

2. Is it safe to provide my social security number to my landlord?

It is generally safe to provide your social security number to your landlord, as they are required to keep your personal information confidential. However, you can ask for clarification on how they will use and protect your information before providing it.

3. Can I refuse to give my social security number to my landlord?

Technically, you can refuse to provide your social security number to your landlord. However, they may have the right to deny your rental application if you do not provide the requested information. It is best to discuss your concerns with your landlord and come to a mutual agreement.

4. Will my landlord have access to my credit score if I provide my social security number?

Your landlord may have access to your credit score if they run a credit check using your social security number. This can help them determine your financial reliability as a tenant. However, they are required to obtain your permission before running a credit check.

5. Can I redact my social security number on the utility bills before giving them to my landlord?

It is not recommended to redact your social security number on utility bills before giving them to your landlord. This may raise questions about the authenticity of the bills and may cause delays in the rental process. It is best to discuss your concerns with your landlord and find a solution that works for both parties.

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