*Need Help: Acceleration and gravity calculation - Thanks

In summary, the conversation is about a student seeking help with understanding how to calculate the acceleration due to gravity for an object dropped from rest. The formula d = 1/2at^3 is provided and it is explained that if the distance and time of fall are measured, the acceleration can be solved for using the formula a = 2d/t^2. The student provides their variables for the calculation and asks for assistance. The experts clarify the formula and suggest putting the numbers into the formula to solve for a.
  • #1
nukeman
655
0

Homework Statement



This is for a Astronomy class, and I have to go over a few examples. But I need help understand the proper steps in calculating this. I will give you as much information as you can.

I have this formula

"For an object dropped from rest, the distance of fall d is related to the time of fall t and acceleration due to gravity a by

d = 1/2at to the 3rd (the 1/2 is 1 over 2)

If we measure d and t we can solve for the acceleration, a:

a = 2d / t squared (2d / t squared mean over, not divided by)

Now my variables for the calculation are simple.

Distance: 4.42 meters

object drop 1: .707 seconds
objects drop 2: .79 seconds

Can anyone help me?





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 
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  • #2
nukeman said:

Homework Statement



This is for a Astronomy class, and I have to go over a few examples. But I need help understand the proper steps in calculating this. I will give you as much information as you can.

I have this formula

"For an object dropped from rest, the distance of fall d is related to the time of fall t and acceleration due to gravity a by

d = 1/2at to the 3rd you mean t squared
(the 1/2 is 1 over 2)

If we measure d and t we can solve for the acceleration, a:

a = 2d / t squared
yes
(2d / t squared mean over, not divided by)
same thing) example: 1 'over' 2 is the same as 1 divided by 2)
Now my variables for the calculation are simple.

Distance: 4.42 meters

object drop 1: .707 seconds
objects drop 2: .79 seconds

Can anyone help me?
Are these values determined in a lab experimemt, and you need to calculate 'a', the acceleration due to gravity? They don't look right...
 
  • #3
your 1st post doesn't make a whole lot of sense if you read back over it. I think you mean d=1/2at^2.
you also don't say what your trying to find out, I assume its gravity(a)
also your meant to have an attempt at solving it before posting.
anyway - very simple put the numbers in your formula and solve for a.
 
  • #4
whoops posted at the same time and virtually the same thing.
 
  • #5


First, let me start by saying that it is great that you are seeking help to better understand the steps for calculating acceleration and gravity. These concepts can be challenging, but with practice and a solid understanding of the formulas, you will be able to solve these types of problems easily.

To calculate acceleration and gravity, we need to use the formula you provided: d = 1/2at^2. This formula relates the distance an object falls (d) to the time it takes to fall (t) and the acceleration due to gravity (a). We can rearrange this formula to solve for a by dividing both sides by t^2, giving us a = 2d/t^2.

Now, let's plug in the values you have been given for your two objects. For object 1, we have a distance of 4.42 meters and a time of 0.707 seconds. Plugging these values into our formula, we get:

a = 2(4.42 meters) / (0.707 seconds)^2

Simplifying, we get a = 2(4.42 meters) / 0.499649 seconds^2, or a = 8.84 meters/seconds^2. This is the acceleration due to gravity for object 1.

For object 2, we have a distance of 4.42 meters and a time of 0.79 seconds. Following the same steps as above, we get:

a = 2(4.42 meters) / (0.79 seconds)^2

Simplifying, we get a = 2(4.42 meters) / 0.6241 seconds^2, or a = 7.07 meters/seconds^2. This is the acceleration due to gravity for object 2.

I hope this explanation helps you understand the process for calculating acceleration and gravity. Remember to always double check your units and show all your work to ensure accuracy. Good luck with your Astronomy class!
 

Related to *Need Help: Acceleration and gravity calculation - Thanks

1. What is acceleration?

Acceleration is the rate at which an object's velocity changes over time. It is typically measured in meters per second squared (m/s^2).

2. How do you calculate acceleration?

Acceleration can be calculated by dividing the change in velocity by the change in time. The formula is: a = (vf - vi) / t, where a is acceleration, vf is final velocity, vi is initial velocity, and t is time.

3. What is the acceleration due to gravity?

The acceleration due to gravity is a constant value of 9.8 m/s^2, which represents the rate at which objects accelerate towards the Earth due to the force of gravity.

4. How do you calculate the acceleration due to gravity?

The acceleration due to gravity can be calculated by dividing the force of gravity acting on an object by its mass. The formula is: a = Fg/m, where a is acceleration due to gravity, Fg is force of gravity, and m is mass.

5. What is the difference between acceleration and velocity?

Acceleration is the rate of change of an object's velocity, while velocity is the speed and direction of an object's motion. In other words, acceleration is how quickly an object's velocity is changing, while velocity is how fast and in what direction the object is moving.

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