Nuclear Physics Find molar binding energy

In summary, molar binding energy, also known as nuclear binding energy, is the amount of energy needed to separate the protons and neutrons in an atom's nucleus. It can be calculated using Einstein's famous equation and is important in understanding nuclear reactions and stability. Molar binding energy also plays a critical role in nuclear fission and fusion, and it can be measured experimentally using various techniques such as mass spectrometry.
  • #1
dav1d
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Homework Statement


What is the molar binding energy of the carbon 12 nuclei?


Homework Equations


e=mc2


The Attempt at a Solution


proton mass = 1.00728u
neutron mass: 1.00866u

before: 6p+6n = 12.09564u
after: carbon 12 = 12u
delta m = 0.009564u

E=mc2
=(.009564u)(9x10^16kJ/g)

now I don't know what to do, you can convert u and g to the same unit but they cancel out, so how do I get kJ/mol
 
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  • #2
Your equation above is the energy per atom. How many atoms per mole?
 
  • #3
I'm getting 8.6 not 8.9 now... Carbon 12 is 12...
 

1. What is molar binding energy?

Molar binding energy, also known as nuclear binding energy, is the amount of energy required to completely separate the protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom.

2. How is molar binding energy calculated?

Molar binding energy can be calculated using Einstein's famous equation, E=mc², where E is energy, m is mass, and c is the speed of light. By measuring the mass of the nucleus and subtracting the mass of the individual protons and neutrons, the amount of energy needed to hold the nucleus together can be determined.

3. Why is molar binding energy important in nuclear physics?

Molar binding energy is crucial in understanding nuclear reactions and stability. It helps explain why certain atoms are more stable than others and why some nuclei undergo radioactive decay. It is also a key factor in nuclear energy and weapons.

4. How does molar binding energy affect nuclear fission and fusion?

In nuclear fission, the splitting of a heavy atom's nucleus releases energy in the form of heat and radiation. This is because the resulting nuclei have a higher molar binding energy than the original nucleus. In nuclear fusion, the combination of two smaller nuclei releases energy because the resulting nucleus has a higher molar binding energy.

5. Can molar binding energy be measured experimentally?

Yes, molar binding energy can be measured using mass spectrometry or other experimental techniques. By analyzing the masses of different nuclei and their components, scientists can determine the molar binding energy and use it to further understand nuclear processes.

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