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News Obama almost touched his feet when greeting an Emperor

  1. Nov 16, 2009 #1
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 16, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

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    I thought the proper political response for a US president meeting the leader of Japan was to throw up?
     
  4. Nov 16, 2009 #3
    Lol I wonder why most of the world doesn't really care for America at all.
     
  5. Nov 16, 2009 #4

    mgb_phys

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    bush-kiss.jpg
    A congressional committee has ruled - No tongues
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
  6. Nov 16, 2009 #5

    BobG

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  7. Nov 16, 2009 #6

    mgb_phys

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    The advantage of a monarchy - you only need to go down on one knee when meeting the head of state!
     
  8. Nov 16, 2009 #7

    Math Is Hard

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    Gee, I think Obama is just showing good manners. I like that in a president. :approve:

    I'm embarrassed to say this, but OMG, the emperor and empress are so cute! Kawaii!!!! They look like porcelain dolls. :shy:
     
  9. Nov 16, 2009 #8

    mgb_phys

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    That's Japanese miniaturization - it's just like cars, German leaders are very well engineered but all weigh a minimum of two tons, British leaders seem fashionable at the time but are underpowered and leak oil.
     
  10. Nov 16, 2009 #9
    hehe, you gotta be kidding.
     
  11. Nov 16, 2009 #10

    Math Is Hard

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
     
  12. Nov 16, 2009 #11

    Moonbear

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    He really does need better advisors when it comes to protocols for greeting leaders of other countries. It's Japanese culture he is screwing up. How far you bow depends on your position. Two presidents would both only bow a little because they are equals. Bowing that low indicates the person he is bowing to is a superior to him.

    Of course, when he's so tall and the Japanese Emperor is so tiny, perhaps it was just to make eye contact. :rofl:

    In the grand scheme of things, at least he tried to respect their culture and greet the Emperor with a bow. Though, why is he traveling to other countries while being left so clueless about the finer points of etiquette when you know these sorts of protocols ARE a big deal to a lot of people? Who on his staff is supposed to be updating him during the flight and is doing a lousy job of it?
     
  13. Nov 16, 2009 #12

    Evo

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    Obama does over do the bowing, given his position. Although so have past presidents, as was dicussed in another thread. I think nit picking over a president bowing has to rank abosolute lowest in prioritites of what to judge a president on. Better to err on the side of being acceptable than be considered insulting.
     
  14. Nov 16, 2009 #13
    I highly doubt that the Emperor thought anything other than wow this guy is just trying to show respect to our culture. I think the Americans that are complaining think WAY too highly of American culture. Like sure it's important to be patriotic and love your nation but they just take it way too far...

    None of the Americans I've seen complain about this are complaining because he bowed 'too low' they are complaining because he bowed period. They themselves would not have bowed at all if they met the Japanese emperor.
    Why?
    Ego.
     
  15. Nov 16, 2009 #14
    It's a sign of weakness! Attack american now!

    (lol caps lock auto turns into lowercase.. ruins the dramatization)
     
  16. Nov 16, 2009 #15

    mheslep

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    Aside from you Sorry, where does one go to poll 'the world' on caring for America?
     
  17. Nov 16, 2009 #16
    Well it figures an American would say something to me about that. Go figure.

    It's the worlds worst kept secret, quite a bit of the world don't like America(mostly so in developed nations). Obama has definitely given America a huge boost though that's for sure.
    Yet these Americans are going against him; even when what he did in Japan helped American-Japanese relations. This is where my comment fits in. Very nice.

    EDIT: From 2002-2007 the world image of America declined quite a bit. Most countries had 50/50 favorable-unfavorable outcome towards America. Countries that liked America most were mostly from Africa. (Ivory coast was #1 88% favorable... Compared to America itself with only 80% favorable.) View of Americans themselves has declined as well but not as much as the view of the country as a whole. In fact most countriese hold a 'slightly favorable' position on Americans.

    So when American worldview is declining it's fair IMO for me to state that I think that the behaviour and views of Americans is one of the reasons for this.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
  18. Nov 16, 2009 #17
    Jealousy, mostly. :!!)
     
  19. Nov 16, 2009 #18
    I've editted my post. As well your comment directed to me was quite smug to begin with so don't expect me to be pleasant.

    The top countries that like American democracy are all African developing nations with the exception of Israel. The top countries that dislike American democracy are from all over the world. South America to Europe to Asia.

    The same trend is pretty much true of the American way of doing business.

    This of course is probably attributable to countries preferring their own way of doing things and the developing nations wanting to model their own ways of doing these things over the superpower of the world but that doesn't mean peoples views are any different.

    Something else I noticed about the poll results is that most countries had more 'very unfavorable' view of America than a 'very favorable' view.

    Interesting:
    Average opinion of USA in 2000 in Canada, Britain, Japan, and Indonesia. (I've averaged these numbers out myself by searching for the different poll years. I picked these countries because in my opinion they had quite a 'favorable' view of America historically. They are infact in 2000 among the top countries holding a favorable view of America):
    76.5% favorable views.

    Same statistic but for 2007:
    49% favorable views (And this is only because Japan still had 61% favorable view. Later in 2008 this drops to 51%)

    Same statistic but for 2009:
    64.75% favorable views (Japan is now at 60% favorable view.)

    A vote of very favorable or slightly favorable is considered a 'favorable view' although most only considered their view 'slightly favorable'.

    We can clearly see that since Obama has taken his position at the Head of America that the views have jumped up impressively...

    If I knew somewhere to host these reports or where they are on the web I would post a link to them but alas no idea so take my word for it :).
    As well this is getting quite off topic so I'd rather not post anything else about this lol.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
  20. Nov 16, 2009 #19

    mgb_phys

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    That's a little loaded, democracies in Europe may or may not like America's foreign policy - not it's electoral system. i don't think many Scandinavians are saying they approve of the policy to Iraq but not of the electoral college.

    Developed countries might just be holding America to a slightly higher standard than their African counterparts. Their opinion may also change more since they are exposed to more upto date and more comprehensive news sources, for most people in Africa having a black president is still 'news'.
     
  21. Nov 16, 2009 #20
    NOTE: Those were different poll results I was giving them in one post. One was public world view of America, another was public world view of Americans, another was public world view of American democracy and the other was public worldview of American way of business.

    Those numbers were from 2007; before Obama was president. As well it was a 47 country survey. It was of how they viewed America as a whole country.
    if I asked you the same question:

    Answer very favorable, somewhat favorable, somewhat unfavorable, very unfavorable.
    How do you view Iran:

    You would give your personal answer.... So would people from all over the globe and then BAM we have the same results only about Iran. In fact this was already done. It seems most of the world HATE Iran.

    The other question was specifically of American democracy I don't see how it's loaded... There was an option of not voting at all... I'll look at these results comparable to past years.


    (As well you might want to read the average results I compiled... I don't see why these countries would suddenly vote they see USA unfavorably because the suddenly hold America to a higher standard. This is a relatively short period of time, 6 years for the numbers to bottom out...)
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
  22. Nov 16, 2009 #21

    mgb_phys

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    So the figures were high in 2000 before the great adventure in the sand, dropped toward the end of the Bush administration and went up after Obama was elected.

    If you ask people what they think of 'American democracy' that's either a loaded questions, or people ignore the democracy part and say what they think about the aspects of America in the news.
     
  23. Nov 16, 2009 #22
    Well it didn't just suddenly 'drop' it was a steady decline. I just picked that year (2007) because it was the year the numbers got lowest for most countries (excluding Japan) and all the countries I was using to average had been polled in that year.

    Yeah so for mostly half of my life people have steadily been disliking America. Hence my comment earlier.

    As well we learn about the electoral college here (in Canada) and I've talked to people from other countries whom say they learn about it too in school. So I don't see why it's more likely that people will answer that they don't like American democracy because they really don't like such and such about America... Like I said the world view of America has dropped significantly but the view of Americans as people haven't. How can your theory account for this?
     
  24. Nov 17, 2009 #23

    mgb_phys

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    Sorry not sure what we are arguing about here ;-)

    By phrasing the question what do you think about American "Democracy" they are loading the question - eg saying "what do you think of America - please note America is a democracy and therefore good".
    People that notice this will generally react against it. If they asked this following the Bush-Gore election the most common response in Europe would have been laughter.

    If you ask this question to people who aren't political scientists they aren't going to answer - American democracy is good except the two party system and the lack of a single transferable vote, and the problem of states with a bi-cameral electoral college etc. They are really answering the question 'what do you think of what America is doing with respect to stuff that was in the news today"

    The stats don't really surprise me, the standing of America (in other developed countries) went up after 9/11 and then gradually downward through Iraq/Abu Gria/Guantanamo etc, and then went back up with Obama.
     
  25. Nov 17, 2009 #24
    I'm just bored and tired :smile:

    However I see what you're saying now I just don't agree with it. The poll had already asked the question of whether or not they saw America in as favorable vs. unfavorable. As well the poll shows that the view of America as a country dropped significantly while other values remained the same (including view of American democracy). So even while America was being negatively received by the world their views of Americans and democracy and way of business didn't change that much.
     
  26. Nov 17, 2009 #25
    It's not often you hear a Canadian use the phrase "America as a country". :smile:
     
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