Official acceleration due to gravity in Brighton, UK?

  • Thread starter cording12
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  • #1
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Hey guys,

I'm newly registered on the forums but have been reading for ages and all the stuff is hugely useful but alas I am finally stuck and can't find any answers to my question!

Now for a lab report I have calculated the acceleration due to gravity using the equation:

g=(2π/m)^2

This is something I did specifically for a report using the slope of a chart I created with some figures from a basic pendulum.

Now for the top marks I need to be able to compare my answer with the official figures for the acceleration due to gravity in Brighton, UK. My lecturer said there is definitely one and other people in my class found it but I never got the chance to speak to them and this is due in tomorrow!

Any help or suggestions on how to find it would be massively appreciated!

Thanks,

Jon
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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The official figures would most likely be held by an institution of higher education in the UK, or a science centre or something similar to that. I don't know where for sure you could find it.

This link has an equation that approximates gravity as a function of altitude above sea level, so if you are able to find your altitude (maybe google earth or something like that), then this might be a plan B solution.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_of_Earth#Altitude
 
  • #3
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Oh brilliant that formula could be exactly what I'm looking for! I've spent hours google'ing and bing'ing it and so far came up with nothing even close to an official figure.

Would you by any chance know where that formula originally came from? I have to reference all formula's and Wikipedia isn't recognised at a citation ><

Thanks a million!
 
  • #5
SteamKing
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For Brighton, it's not so much the altitude (Brighton is mostly close to sea level) as the latitude which will have more influence on the local value of g.
 
  • #6
SteamKing
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This link has the Int. Gravity Formula:
http://geophysics.ou.edu/solid_earth/notes/potential/igf.htm [Broken]
 
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  • #7
davenn
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For Brighton, it's not so much the altitude (Brighton is mostly close to sea level) as the latitude which will have more influence on the local value of g.
and even more so what the local geology is in that region ie. rock type
example an area of continental rock is going to have a lower local value of g
than what an area of volcanics would. that is volcanic rock is denser and produces a positive anomaly

cheers
Dave
 
  • #8
1,033
1
Oh brilliant that formula could be exactly what I'm looking for! I've spent hours google'ing and bing'ing it and so far came up with nothing even close to an official figure.

Would you by any chance know where that formula originally came from? I have to reference all formula's and Wikipedia isn't recognised at a citation ><

Thanks a million!
No clue where it came from. sorry
 

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