Optical Probe Clarity: Examining Power Loss vs. Beam Spot

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of laser probes in a lab for testing vibration and other data. The speaker is working on creating a signal power budget for each probe by calculating power loss using a laser source and detector. They believe this is a better option than simply looking at the beam spot. The safety class of the laser is mentioned to be 3B.
  • #1
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I work in a lab that uses laser probes to test for vibration and other data, currently the lab techs hook up the probe to a laser source and check to see how bright and clear the beam spot is. I have been working on having a signal power budget created for each probe using a laser source and detector and calculating the probes power loss in dBm and dB.

Am I wrong in believing this is a better option then just looking at the beam spot?
 
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  • #2
daniel1211 said:
I work in a lab that uses laser probes to test for vibration and other data, currently the lab techs hook up the probe to a laser source and check to see how bright and clear the beam spot is. I have been working on having a signal power budget created for each probe using a laser source and detector and calculating the probes power loss in dBm and dB.

Am I wrong in believing this is a better option then just looking at the beam spot?
What is the safety class of the laser?
 
  • #3
Class 3B
 

1. What is an optical probe?

An optical probe is a tool used in scientific research and testing to measure various properties of light, such as intensity, polarization, and wavelength. It consists of a light source, a detector, and a means of controlling the light beam, such as lenses or mirrors.

2. How does an optical probe work?

An optical probe works by directing a light beam onto a sample or material of interest, and then measuring how the light is affected by the sample. This can provide information about the properties of the sample, such as its refractive index, absorption coefficient, or reflectivity.

3. What is power loss in optical probes?

Power loss in optical probes refers to the decrease in intensity of the light beam as it passes through the probe and interacts with the sample. This can be caused by factors such as absorption, scattering, or reflection.

4. What is beam spot in optical probes?

Beam spot in optical probes refers to the size and shape of the light beam as it enters the probe and interacts with the sample. The beam spot can affect the accuracy and precision of measurements, as well as the amount of power loss experienced by the probe.

5. How does power loss relate to beam spot in optical probes?

Power loss and beam spot are closely related in optical probes. A larger beam spot can lead to higher power loss, as the light is spread out over a larger area. Conversely, a smaller beam spot can result in lower power loss, but it may also be more difficult to accurately measure the beam's properties. Finding a balance between beam spot and power loss is important for obtaining accurate and reliable measurements with an optical probe.

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