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B Origin and demonstration of Newton's second law

  1. Dec 22, 2017 #1
    At highschool, we saw without demonstration the fundamental principle of dynamics (2th Newton's law), i.e :

    $$\sum \vec{F}=m \vec{a}\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,eq(1)$$

    after, at university, we saw another expression of this 2th Newton's law :

    $$\sum \vec{F}= \dfrac{d\vec{p}}{dt}\,\,\,\,\, \,\,\,eq(2)$$ with ##\vec{p} = m\vec{v}## the momentum.

    From an historical point of view, which one was defined by Newton, eq(1) or (eq2) ?

    The eq(2) allows to deduce the famous equation ##E=mc^{2}## by considering ##dp=d(mv)=dm\,v +m\,dv## but I think that Newton could not have access to ##dm## and so defined rather ##m=\text{constant}##, didn't he ?

    Does the origin of eq(1) and eq(2) come from physical experiments performed by Newton ?

    Secondly, we can proove eq(2) thanks to Euler-Lagrange equation, taking ##p_{i}## the i-th momentum :

    $$\dfrac{d}{dt}\bigg(\dfrac{ \partial L}{\partial \dot{q}_{i}}\bigg)=\dfrac{d\,p _{i}}{dt}=\sum F$$

    Are there other ways to get the eq(2) ?

    Finally, one told me that Newton has used geometric demonstration : Anyone could give me a link on these geometric prooves ?

    Thanks for your help
     

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    Last edited: Dec 23, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 23, 2017 #2
    The second.

    We will never know. He didn't explain how he derived this equation.
     
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