Physics engineering Or Applied Physics? ....theoretical?

In summary, the person is seeking advice on which career path to choose: physics engineering, applied physics, or theoretical physics. They have a passion for science and technology, particularly in the areas of optics and optoelectronics. They are concerned about job opportunities in these fields in Mexico and are unsure about which career would be the best fit for their interests. They are seeking clarification and advice from others before making a decision.
  • #1
Pacopescador
Hey there.
I am going to stay the University next year and I want to know what do you think about the three options I have actually.

I really like science, and I like to know about the process of the nature, how it is defined by math and by the physical processes. It is my passion I, in the other hand, I like to make things to do something, for example some dispositives and I know that science is not that away from things like these. It is why I am thinking about a bachelor of science.

I am really interested in Physics Engineering because it sounds great, and all the contents in Optoelectronic devices are such a magnificent thing for me (One guy told me that It is posible to get a degree in Theoretical if you want, even if you have studied Physics engineering, and that is great) , that I want to make some experiments and use technology, and that is good for my chance to get a job in other areas like industry, tech or something like this. It is said that the applied physics is like this but I have heard from people that is studying the A.P career that most of the people who is in the bachelor at the end, almost never find a place where to work (like Industry or something else, even I heard from a Ph.D in Optics that when she wanted to get a job in an industry, while she was just a Master, the people there said that she was over-qualified).

I have to say, I am in MEXICO , and there are not a lot of well paid job opportunitties for physicists, even it is not easy to find a place where to work in the area that you decide (I have one friend that is an investigator in Quantum in one university "A" , he was just for a period of time, but he could get a job in another area that could give him an investigator job for undefined time, and he had to accept to change to the other University "B" for the reason to get an stable job.)

Anyways, when I think about Theoretical Physics, I am afraid about just having chance to work making investigation for Universities or something, and that is good if you are interested about that amazing areas like Quantum,Astrophysics,where the Universities are most prepared places for that.

I mean, it is really interesting, but I would not like to work in that areas, I would like to work with most common areas, like Electronics, Optics, Optoelectronics, Optical design, technology areas.

That areas where the ones that made me to choose this area from all the different careers.
I have a passion about optics, and I would like to study something to can design the lenses inside the Reflex cameras.

What would you recommend me?

Physics engineering or Applied physics? Or the Theoretical? what is the real difference between the three careers?
I am thinking about the Physics engineering, but I am afraid that in the future, it won´t help me to get an schoolarship to study the optical design that I want, anyways. I am not sure at all.

Thanks for your advise, and sorry for making you to read soo much text.
 
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  • #2
I strongly recommend that you dig a bit more into what real opportunities lie ahead of you. I can't begin to estimate the job market in Mexico, but I'm sure that there are those there who can do better. Ask questions of people there. It sounds to me like you really do not yet know what you want, so I think clarification there is the first order of business.
 

Related to Physics engineering Or Applied Physics? ....theoretical?

1. What is the difference between physics engineering and applied physics?

Physics engineering focuses on applying principles of physics to solve practical problems and design new technologies, while applied physics is a broader field that includes the application of physics to various other disciplines such as medicine, materials science, and energy production.

2. What kinds of careers are available in physics engineering or applied physics?

Careers in physics engineering or applied physics can include research and development, product design, quality control, and consulting in industries such as aerospace, electronics, and renewable energy. They can also pursue academic or government positions in research labs or teaching institutions.

3. Is physics engineering or applied physics a good major for someone interested in both science and engineering?

Yes, both fields provide a good balance between theoretical knowledge and practical skills, making them ideal for those who have an interest in both science and engineering. Students can choose to specialize in a specific area of physics or engineering, or pursue a combination of both through interdisciplinary programs.

4. How is theoretical physics used in engineering or applied physics?

Theoretical physics is used to develop models and mathematical equations that can be used to predict and explain physical phenomena. These theories are then applied in engineering and applied physics to design and optimize technologies, as well as to understand and improve existing systems.

5. What are some current research areas in physics engineering or applied physics?

Some current research areas in physics engineering and applied physics include nanotechnology, renewable energy, quantum computing, and biophysics. These fields are constantly evolving, and scientists and engineers are always exploring new ways to apply physics principles to solve real-world problems and advance technology.

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