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Physics in a frictionless plane.

  1. Oct 2, 2011 #1
    Imagine a frictionless world. Movement along the world is constrained to the plane of the ground. (The world has gravity)

    How would life on the frictionless world be similar to our own? What are somethings that would not change due to the existance of friction?

    What are some similarities between a system on a plane with friction and on a plane without friction?

    Logically, I would say that inertia holds true for both and Newton's first and second laws hold true however I don't know how one would exert a force to cause an object to move on a friction less plane. (All of this is assuming that this is in a vacuum)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 2, 2011 #2
    Well, I'd say walking would be out of the question.
     
  4. Oct 5, 2011 #3
    Chemical reactions would be the same, I can't imagine moving from 1 point to another to be particularly feasible
     
  5. Oct 5, 2011 #4
    Without anything to push from, you would need to move around like in space, with little jets or cans with compressed air and use propulsion to move around.

    Or in order to move things (or yourself), you could use things to push from, like objects built into the ground...it's a frictionless plane, but nobody said it needed to be plain...these 'objects' can be as simple as grooves on the ground, etc.

    Now, I don't know why you said all this is in a vacuum...if it is frictionless, why do you need vacuum? Just say that drag is not there, either, because of firctionless world...other than that...I need to breath!

    Typing on a keyboard would be the same.
    Drinking from a mug would be the same.
    Putting clothes on would be the same.
    Reading a book would be the same.

    I am not exactly sure the extent of your question about similarities between the two worlds...what's the context?
     
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