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Physics Major (WAS:Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?)

  1. Feb 25, 2009 #1
    Does anyone know of scientific anomalies that don't agree with the theories we've used to predict and explain physical phenomenon?

    If so, must I try to find a new theory that explains both the anomalies and the other phenomenon, too?

    Please give me the articles or personal findings you've found dealing with the certitude of flaw of in theories such as Newtonian Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics, Electromagnetic Radiation, Brownian Motion, Ect...

    Please don't give flaws in string theory or things that go below quark level sizes, I won't understand cause I only know Calculus at best.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 25, 2009 #2
  4. Feb 25, 2009 #3
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    There are all kinds of unanswered questions in science. Are you asking for examples of things we don't understand yet, or do you mean examples of experiment not matching predictions of some of the theories/frameworks you listed (or worse, the theory self-contradicting)?
     
  5. Feb 25, 2009 #4
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    physical phenomenon not yet understood, at the macroscopic scale, like the casimir effect. The pioneer anomaly I know about, but that could just be a measurement error or fuel leak.

    But I'm also talking about partial contradiction in theories when experiments don't match predictions based on theories and frameworks.

    Either physical phenomenon that's unexplained, or variations in the predictions made by the theories assuming accurate measurement is what I'm looking for.
     
  6. Feb 25, 2009 #5
  7. Feb 25, 2009 #6
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    Interesting I thought Pioneer was explained by things that were possible.

    But I guess it really is unexplainable.

    Anything else you know about that's considered an anomaly by modern science?
     
  8. Feb 25, 2009 #7
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    Is there a proven explanation yet for the dual nature, particle and wave, of a photon? It's atomic but the effect can be seen without a microscope.
     
  9. Feb 25, 2009 #8

    turbo

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    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    You've got to dig a bit deeper. Spin-stabilized and even partial spin-stabilized probes seem to exhibit this propensity for anomalous behavior. We might consider a variable speed of EM propagation, a variable gravitational "constant" or some combination of the two. There are also fly-by anomalies in which probes seem to require course-corrections that were inaccurately modeled during their design stages.
     
  10. Feb 25, 2009 #9
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    Here's a list of physics conundrums.
    http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/~streater/lostcauses.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  11. Feb 25, 2009 #10
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    this is what I was looking for, thanks a lot!
     
  12. Feb 26, 2009 #11

    alxm

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    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    Most 'anomalies' are measurement errors. Most 'unexplained' phenomena fall into the category of 'not explained but not believed to be unexplainable in current theory'.

    It was either Feynman or Stephen Weinberg, who, in one of their more pop-scientific books also noted, to paraphrase: "It's the normal state of affairs in science to have lots of contradicting information. There's nothing that raises a flag and says 'Hi! I'm an important deviation from theory!'"

    But you can't really explain ordinary classical macroscopic phenomena properly using basic math. Classical physics is really just as math-heavy as the others once you get to a more advanced level. It's kind of hard then, to get to a position where you can develop a truly new theory, or prove the old ones wrong.

    To be blunt, the world can always use more scientists, but has no great need of another crackpot who thinks he's just proved Einstein wrong using misguided logic and high-school math.

    That said, I don't want to discourage you from attempting to tackle big unsolved problems. I'm just saying that you'll probably have to be prepared to study a lot to truly understand the problem. (And once you do, you start to realize why it's unsolved.. it's 'effing hard!)
     
  13. Feb 26, 2009 #12
  14. Feb 26, 2009 #13
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    Ok this means I need to understand all of the things of people who came before me and those that exist now.

    I need to learn the highest levels of math and physics, and use experimental procedure to find the evidence.

    But what's after understanding all of the most complex math? Is there something more complex after that? Or is this the limit that we've reached?
     
  15. Feb 26, 2009 #14
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    Its how you view math. If Algebra seems difficult then higher math will even difficult, but if you understand Algebra, but see Calculus hard then everything above Calculus will be hard. Math is complex depending on person and his or her level in math. There is a lot of complex math that we don't tap on a frequent basis were we might use it one day and that's it.
     
  16. Feb 26, 2009 #15
    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    Yes endeavor,

    But what are the group of math courses that are post graduate level and have the lowest human understanding of others?

    Some math I heard only 10 people knew in the world, can u tell me of any math branch or specialized field or course that's like this?

    I'm looking for the limit of what we've accepted as possibly mathematically true without a doubt. Highest level proofs and that stuff.
     
  17. Feb 26, 2009 #16

    Nabeshin

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    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    Post-graduate implies that you're no longer taking classes. What you'd be doing is mathematical research into new areas. If only two people want to study a given mathematical subject, then only two people in the world know something about it. Simple as that. I don't have any examples, but this is not the way things tend to happen (because of the system of fellowships at universities and such, research is often clumped into already populated areas).
     
  18. Feb 27, 2009 #17

    ZapperZ

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    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    This thread has morphed into an academic guidance issue. So I am moving it into that forum.

    Zz.
     
  19. Feb 27, 2009 #18

    alxm

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    Re: Any Anomalies in Physics at Above-Atomic Level?

    I'll refer to Pólya's classic book "How to solve it". Step one: Understand the problem.

    The first thing any research does when they decide to work on a new problem, is to spend quite
    a lot of time researching all the previous work that's been done. Experimental data, previous theories, and why those previous theories didn't work.

    If you don't do that in any field of Science, Maths even Philosophy, it's not only possible but likely that your great idea was already thought of. (or worse, that it's wrong on some very basic level). E.g. if you read some philosophy, you'll probably start recognizing that most ideas coming from café-table philosophers were already thought of, and expressed better, by some Greek two-thousand years ago.
     
  20. Feb 27, 2009 #19
    Ok, so I need to become two things and nothing else to solve these math problems.

    1. Scientist (also Comp)
    2. Mathematician

    What's the fastest way of understanding and learning all of the information in both fields?
     
  21. Feb 27, 2009 #20
    I don't think it's hyperbole to say that learning and understanding all the information in science and maths is beyond any human! (Even if by science you just mean physics)

    To solve any particular problem you will need a set of tools and knowledge of the problem. For a theoretical physicist mathematical techniques are the tools. However most modern physics problems require that you understand a lot the previous physics...

    You also asked about the limits of mathematics. I think formally the limits are pretty low! See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gödel's_incompleteness_theorems
     
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