University Search for a Physics Major

In summary, the speaker is planning to apply to schools for a physics major in about a year and is looking for suggestions for universities that are not as competitive as MIT and Princeton. They are specifically interested in suggestions from the US and UK, and also welcome recommendations for liberal arts colleges. They are an Indian citizen and require financial aid. The speaker also mentions considering universities in Canada and asks for input from others on their thoughts about studying in Canada. The conversation also includes a recommendation for Carleton College and Wellesley College as potential options.
  • #36
hutchphd said:
I will throw out about ten that come to mind. I am not expert

One I will mention that is known as good but is not that hard to get into is Virginia Tech. Exactly why that is, I do not know.
https://www.niche.com/colleges/virginia-tech/admissions/

That is in the US.

A good course in Australia that is easy to get into is:
https://www.griffith.edu.au/study/degrees/bachelor-of-science-advanced-honours-1330

Most who do that degree double major in physics and applied math then decide what to get their honours in 4th year ie either physics or applied math honours.

If you are willing to consider the UK, the following is interesting:
https://www.open.ac.uk/choose/openplus/

Thanks
Bill
 
  • Like
Likes Falgun and hutchphd
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #37
I'm somewhat confused. From what I've seen some sources state the maximum possible GPA as 4.0 and some as 5.0 . Which of the following is more common? In India, we usually calculate the Cumulative Grade Point Average of an academic year to have the maximum value of 10.0 .

Also there's this concept of weighted and unweighted GPA. Correct me if I'm wrong, weighted GPA takes into account the difficulty of the courses taken and unweighted GPA does not. Which is commonly used in Uni admissions or does it vary among different institutions.

If so how is weighted average calculated?
 
  • #38
It's weighted GPA in the last line not weighted average.
 
  • Like
Likes bhobba
  • #39
Falgun said:
It's weighted GPA in the last line not weighted average.

To elaborate, many HS's in the USA weight honours and AP courses by taking them out of 5 instead of 4. That is how it is possible to get a GPA greater than 4. In Australia, you get extra points for taking more challenging courses like math that includes calculus and a foreign language. You get the most significant weighting for completing the equivalent of a year at university - with progressively less weighting for doing less than a year. In Aus, you have the university of open learning anyone can do courses from. Just two university subjects with at least a credit and simply passing grade 12 (or in some cases not even competing HS) will usually get you into most studies.

In the UK, it is different again, but I am not sure of the exact details. The one I suggested is you do two years part-time at their university of open learning, and you gain automatic entry to the second year at some universities.

Thanks
Bill
 
  • #40
bhobba said:
To elaborate, many HS's in the USA weight honours and AP courses by taking them out of 5 instead of 4. That is how it is possible to get a GPA greater than 4. In Australia, you get extra points for taking more challenging courses like math that includes calculus and a foreign language. You get the most significant weighting for completing the equivalent of a year at university - with progressively less weighting for doing less than a year. In Aus, you have the university of open learning anyone can do courses from. Just two university subjects with at least a credit and simply passing grade 12 (or in some cases not even competing HS) will usually get you into most studies.

In the UK, it is different again, but I am not sure of the exact details. The one I suggested is you do two years part-time at their university of open learning, and you gain automatic entry to the second year at some universities.

Thanks
Bill
Thanks for clearing that up.

Actually if you choose to study science in your junior and senior year in India you get the option of choosing the following combinations:

  1. Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Elective, English
  2. Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Elective, English
  3. Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology , English
I have chosen the 3rd combination. From comparing standard textbooks at US universities , I find that my courses are just below a University course. For example anyone who studies mathematics at Junior and Senior years has to learn Single variable Calculus.

So I feel pretty much ready for a US uni . But I'm still planning to take AP courses in Physics C , Calculus BC, and Statistics and maybe Chemistry. Since my school doesn't have APs , I'll travel to a nearby city to take the exams. So I guess I'll have to self report the scores, since they won't show up on my transcript (right?) .

Also for some background information, I'll be taking the SAT in March. I've consistently hitting 1500+ on official tests by College Board.

I'm also prepping for physics Olympiad and astronomy Olympiad this year.
 
  • Like
Likes bhobba
  • #41
OP you won't need to self-report your AP scores. You will instruct the College Board (issuers of AP courses) to submit the scores on your behalf.
 

Suggested for: University Search for a Physics Major

Back
Top