Physics of a kayaking situation

  • Thread starter Jack Brown
  • Start date
  • #1
I recently went kayaking and can't get my head around the physics going on in the situation I experienced. I'll try explain it as best as I can. The kayak is hollow and is basically a shell.

  • A kayak is flipped while on the surface of a water, so I was still sitting inside it but now under water.
  • I then fell out of the sitting position while under water and then swam to the surface to turn the kayak back over to the upright normal position.
  • When trying to turn the kayak back over it is difficult because there appears to be an air pressure seal between the water and the place where the person sits, because the kayak is still full of air. So it takes more force to turn it back over.

Where is the best place to push the kayak to break this seal, at the ends or towards the middle and should I push at an angle or straight up? What are the physics principles at work here?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Doug Huffman
Gold Member
804
111
The inverted kayak is partially flooded and you're trying to lift some of that water. I think lift at the widest section, with the most leverage, and the largest widest cockpit opening. Better, learn Eskimo roll with the skirt intact.
 

Related Threads on Physics of a kayaking situation

Replies
6
Views
771
Replies
7
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
6K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
728
Replies
2
Views
658
Replies
14
Views
6K
Top