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'Physics' Terms for Integral quantities?

  1. Feb 3, 2016 #1
    'Flux' is often used to describe quantities associated with a surface integral.

    I wonder if there are corresponding terms for the line and volume integrals. Linflux? Volux?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2016 #2

    jedishrfu

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    Here's an article on flux:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux

    With respect to your question, I've never heard of formal terms for flux of a line integral or volume integral.

    The nearest thing I could think of is flow for a line integral and even that is used with the others.

    Perhaps one of the math mentors can pitch in here @micromass or @Mark44 or @HallsofIvy
     
  4. Feb 3, 2016 #3

    ZapperZ

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    I'm puzzled. A "flux", by definition, is the rate of flow of something through a surface! You can't remove the surface from it, because that is part of its definition.

    This is like asking for an electron with charge -3e.

    A "line" flux makes no sense because a mathematical line that we use has no width. A "volume" flux also makes no sense, because a flux through a closed surface, i.e. enclosing a volume, is already part of our standard idea of flux.

    Zz.
     
  5. Feb 3, 2016 #4
    I think both of you have misunderstood my question.

    I was wondering if there is a physics term to label a line integral in the manner in which flux 'labels' surface integrals.

    Just wanna know whether there are other names for a line integral that relate to physics
     
  6. Feb 3, 2016 #5

    ZapperZ

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    We would have understood you better if you care to explain what you want. For example, what does "...label a line integral in the manner in which flux 'labels' surface integral.... " mean? Label?

    Zz.
     
  7. Feb 3, 2016 #6
    Ok pal, don't need to be so condescending. I can't hear the tone of your voice but the one I'm hearing in my head sounds like that. I don't know if its just me or if that's your intention but this is my feedback, You gotta be mindful online that text can't convey emotion very well.

    Anyway, I'm just wondering if there are alternate terms related to line and volume integrals like flux is related to surface integrals
     
  8. Feb 3, 2016 #7

    ZapperZ

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    I give up.

    Zz.
     
  9. Feb 3, 2016 #8
    I wasn't trying to scold you, I stated that it was just my feedback.

    I think that its a good thing. What if you had been offending people all the time without intending to? Relax.

    (the reason I mentioned 'condescending is because Zz said "if you care to explain")
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2016
  10. Feb 3, 2016 #9

    boneh3ad

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    I think you misunderstand what flux is. Flux is some quantity passing through a surface, so it is not just a surface integral. It is a surface of a vector field projected normally to said surface.

    To my knowledge, there isn't such a term or concept applying to line or volume integrals, as they aren't generally used in the same way. Sometimes you'll see line integrals used similarly with a vector field but it is often just a flux that has been simplified so that the depth is assumed to be unity (or other such simplification).
     
  11. Feb 3, 2016 #10
    oh, no, I'm not saying that flux is equivalent to surface integrals. Potential difference use line integrals alot.
     
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