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Physics velocity acceleration and force -- Project

  1. Sep 24, 2015 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    We did two trials she didn't really go over it. first trial (1m, 1.50 seconds), (1.30m, 2.00 seconds) (1.5, 3.22); second trial (1m, 1.45), (1,30m, 2.03), (1m, 1.46) The mass of the weighted object is 50 and 200 g for the one in the car. We measured how far the toy truck traveled and the time till the end of the board. I'm thinking I should be trying to solve for the acceleration, but idk if thats what shes asking for

    2. Relevant equations
    V=d/t, A=V/t, and at=v, f=ma
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 24, 2015 #2
    Yeah and with that description I have no idea what you're asking either. Good luck.
     
  4. Sep 25, 2015 #3
    We are supposed to do graphs on excel i guess and yeah i don't know which equation i'm supposed to start with. There are two velocity equations, the teacher mentioned using the graphs to determine the acceleration. So i have no clue. LOL. We are supposed to end with the Force equation.
     
  5. Sep 25, 2015 #4
    We are supposed to have three graphs one with distance vs time, velocity vs. time, acceleration vs. time. But there are two Velocity equations..... :( idk
     
  6. Sep 25, 2015 #5

    billy_joule

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    It's still not clear what you did.

    It sounds like there was a pulley and a hanging weight ('the weighted object') ? Draw a labelled diagram of the experimental set up.
     
  7. Sep 28, 2015 #6
    We have to find the slope (Acceleration) and compare it to the F=ma equation. And the measurements that I'm getting are different. I'm guessing I messed up on the calculations.. :(
     
  8. Sep 28, 2015 #7

    billy_joule

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    Science Advisor

    Maybe.
    We'll never know unless you explain what you did and what you are trying to do.

    this post still applies:
     
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