Plot VLE w/Wilson, Margules & van Laar: How To & Example

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In summary, VLE stands for Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in thermodynamics, where a liquid and its vapor coexist in equilibrium. The Wilson, Margules, and van Laar models are used in VLE calculations to estimate the activity coefficients of components in a liquid mixture. To plot VLE using these models, parameters must be determined using experimental data and then used to calculate activity coefficients at different conditions. The significance of these parameters lies in accurately predicting the behavior of the mixture. For example, in a binary mixture of benzene and toluene, the Wilson, Margules, and van Laar models can be used to plot the VLE curve by determining and using parameters from experimental data.
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scott_for_the_game
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Using the equations Wilson’s, Margules’, and van Laar’s, plot the predicted VLE for this system at this temperature, with and without the use of fugacity coefficients.

Anyone know how to do this or can explain to me how to do VLE. Or have a link for a worked example.

Cheers.
 
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Vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) is an important thermodynamic concept that describes the equilibrium between a liquid and its vapor phase at a given temperature and pressure. The VLE behavior of a mixture can be predicted using various equations, such as the Wilson’s, Margules’, and van Laar’s equations.

To plot the predicted VLE for a system using these equations, you will first need to gather the necessary data, including the temperature, pressure, and composition of the mixture. You will also need to know the interaction parameters for the specific components in the mixture, which can be found in thermodynamic databases.

Once you have all the necessary data, you can use the Wilson’s, Margules’, and van Laar’s equations to calculate the activity coefficients of the components in the mixture. These activity coefficients can then be used to calculate the fugacity coefficients, which take into account the non-ideal behavior of the mixture.

To plot the VLE, you will need to use a phase diagram, with the liquid and vapor phases on the y-axis and the composition of the mixture on the x-axis. You can then plot the predicted VLE for the system at the given temperature, with and without the use of fugacity coefficients.

A worked example of this process can be found in thermodynamics textbooks or online resources. I recommend checking out the following link for a detailed explanation and step-by-step guide on how to plot VLE using Wilson’s, Margules’, and van Laar’s equations: https://www.engineersedge.com/thermodynamics/vapor_liquid_equilibrium.htm

I hope this helps you understand how to use these equations and plot VLE for a given system. However, it is important to note that predicting VLE is a complex process and may require additional data or assumptions. It is always best to consult with a thermodynamics expert or refer to reliable resources for accurate results.
 

Related to Plot VLE w/Wilson, Margules & van Laar: How To & Example

1. What is VLE in the context of thermodynamics?

VLE stands for Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, which is a thermodynamic state where a liquid and its vapor coexist in equilibrium. This means that the rate of evaporation of the liquid is equal to the rate of condensation of the vapor.

2. What is the Wilson, Margules, and van Laar models used for in VLE calculations?

These models are commonly used in VLE calculations to estimate the activity coefficients of the components in a liquid mixture. They take into account the interactions between the components, which affects the behavior of the mixture at different temperatures and pressures.

3. How do you plot VLE using the Wilson, Margules, and van Laar models?

To plot VLE using these models, you will need to first determine the parameters for each model using experimental data. Then, use these parameters to calculate the activity coefficients at different temperatures and pressures. Finally, plot the activity coefficients against the liquid mole fraction to obtain the VLE curve.

4. What is the significance of the Wilson, Margules, and van Laar parameters in VLE calculations?

The parameters for these models represent the strength of the interactions between the components in a liquid mixture. They are crucial in accurately predicting the behavior of the mixture at different conditions and are determined through experimental data.

5. Can you provide an example of using the Wilson, Margules, and van Laar models to plot VLE?

For example, if we have a binary mixture of benzene and toluene, we can use experimental data to determine the Wilson, Margules, and van Laar parameters for this system. Then, we can use these parameters to calculate the activity coefficients at different temperatures and pressures and plot them against the liquid mole fraction to obtain the VLE curve for this mixture.

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