Potassium or other minerals and the photoelectic effect

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In summary, it is not clear from your question what you already know about UVC and metal work function. UVC does not emit electrons at a constant rate, and higher energy photons will be able to cause more photoelectrons to be emitted.
  • #1
pager48
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Would UVC shined onto Potassium cause it to emanate more electrons than its specific work function? Does only the specific work function per mineral cause the mineral to emanate electrons or more energetic sources can also cause it to do the same without using its specific work function?
 
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  • #2
pager48 said:
Would UVC shined onto Potassium cause it to emanate more electrons than its specific work function? Does only the specific work function per mineral cause the mineral to emanate electrons or more energetic sources can also cause it to do the same without using its specific work function?
It's not clear from your question, what your existing level of knowledge is. Potassium is a metal and not a 'mineral'. Is your question a general one or is it particularly related to UVC?
The work function is just the minimum photon energy needed to release a photoelectron from the very surface atoms of a metal. It's a threshold value of energy. It is not an 'on-off' process and higher energy photons will be able to cause more photoelectrons to be emitted - there will be a progressive increase in photocurrent for a constant rate of photons arriving as the frequency increases.
Photons with higher energy will result in faster photoelectrons or, for high enough energy, will release tighter bound electrons which may result in more than just one electron being released
 
  • #3
This was in regards to whether a metal can emanate more electrons from a higher energetic UVC emitter.

Whats the rate of electrons emmited and at which velocity from a 3^2cm potassium surface area from a typical 8w mercury enclosed in quartz UVC emitter? Supposing the lamp would be 2-3 inches away from the metal.
 
  • #4
pager48 said:
Whats the rate of electrons emmited and at which velocity from a 3^2cm potassium surface area
From what the textbooks tell us, the Potassium surface needs to be clean - for the purposes of measuring work function. The standard apparatus has a blade inside the vacuum which scrapes the metal surface. (See any A Level txt book.)
You haven't described the context of this. Are you trying to make a calibrated detector? Why would you DIY the thing when there must be such things available.
 

Related to Potassium or other minerals and the photoelectic effect

1. What is the photoelectric effect?

The photoelectric effect is the phenomenon where certain metals emit electrons when exposed to light of a specific frequency. This was first observed by physicist Heinrich Hertz in 1887 and later explained by Albert Einstein in 1905.

2. How does the photoelectric effect relate to potassium and other minerals?

Potassium and other minerals are essential for the functioning of the photoelectric effect. These minerals are used as conductors in the metal plates of photoelectric cells, allowing for the flow of electrons when exposed to light.

3. What is the role of potassium in the photoelectric effect?

Potassium plays a crucial role in the photoelectric effect as it is a highly conductive metal that is often used in the plates of photoelectric cells. It allows for the easy flow of electrons when exposed to light, making it an important component in this phenomenon.

4. Can potassium and other minerals affect the efficiency of the photoelectric effect?

Yes, the type and amount of minerals used in photoelectric cells can greatly impact the efficiency of the photoelectric effect. Different minerals have varying levels of conductivity, which can affect the flow of electrons and the overall performance of the cell.

5. How is the photoelectric effect used in modern technology?

The photoelectric effect has many practical applications in modern technology, such as in solar panels, digital cameras, and motion sensors. It is also used in scientific research, such as in spectroscopy and studying the properties of light.

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