Pressure, volume, and temperature

In summary, The conversation discusses the ratio of the volume of 300C steam at 1.0 atm pressure to an equal mass of liquid water, and the possibility of treating steam as an ideal gas in calculations. The conversation also mentions the importance of looking at the density of water to determine the volume of a given mass.
  • #1
j88k
27
0

Homework Statement



What is the ratio of the volume occupied by 300C steam at 1.0 atm pressure to the volume occupied by an equal mass of liquid water?

Homework Equations



P1V1/T1=P2V2/T2 ??

The Attempt at a Solution



not sure where to start
 
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  • #2
Can you look up the density of steam at that temperature and pressure?
I think the Handbook of Chemistry has such a table. Or try Wikipedia.
 
  • #3
No, no, Delphi, that is not in the spirit of Physics. What are you, an engineer? ;-)

Actually, you want to look at the density of water. Fairly easy. From water's density, determine the volume of a given mass.

Depending on the level of your physics class, you might be able to treat steam as an ideal gas. If so, use the ideal gas law to determine the volume of the steam.
 
  • #4
an engineer?
Oh, no! I don't know if I would trust water to be an ideal gas, though. Maybe we need a chemist!
 
  • #5
Delphi51 said:
Oh, no! I don't know if I would trust water to be an ideal gas, though. Maybe we need a chemist!

In freshman physics books there are dozens of questions which tell you to "treat the [whatever] as an ideal gas." In advanced thermodynamics, you need to add the specific qualifying ratios, but this didn't sound like an advanced level question.
 

Related to Pressure, volume, and temperature

What is the relationship between pressure, volume, and temperature?

The relationship between pressure, volume, and temperature is described by the ideal gas law, which states that the product of pressure and volume is directly proportional to the absolute temperature of a gas. This means that as pressure increases, volume decreases, and as temperature increases, both pressure and volume increase.

How does changing pressure affect the volume of a gas?

Changing the pressure of a gas will cause a change in its volume, as long as the temperature remains constant. This is known as Boyle's Law, which states that the volume of a gas is inversely proportional to its pressure. In other words, as pressure increases, volume decreases, and vice versa.

What happens to the temperature of a gas when its volume is decreased?

When the volume of a gas is decreased, its temperature will increase if the pressure is held constant. This is known as Charles's Law, which states that the volume of a gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature. As volume decreases, the gas molecules are forced closer together, increasing their kinetic energy and therefore, the temperature of the gas.

How are pressure, volume, and temperature related in a closed system?

In a closed system, changes in pressure, volume, and temperature are related by the combined gas law, which takes into account all three variables. The combined gas law states that the product of pressure and volume is directly proportional to the absolute temperature, as long as the amount of gas and its properties remain constant.

What units are typically used to measure pressure, volume, and temperature?

Pressure is commonly measured in units of atmospheres (atm), volume in liters (L), and temperature in degrees Celsius (°C) or Kelvin (K). However, other units such as pascals (Pa), cubic meters (m3), and degrees Fahrenheit (°F) may also be used depending on the context and preference of the scientist or researcher.

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