Calculate the ratio of new volume to old volume

In summary, the question asks for the ratio of new volume to old volume (V1/V2) if the pressure is held constant during a temperature rise from 23°C to 34°C. Using the general gas equation and Charles' Law, we can determine that the ratio of the temperatures (T2/T1) is equal to the ratio of the volumes (V2/V1). By converting the temperatures to Kelvin and solving for the ratio, we get a final value of 1.04, representing a 4% increase in volume.
  • #1
Richie Smash
293
15

Homework Statement


A car tyre has initial temperature 23°C and inital pressure 2*105 Pa
After heating in the sun, temperature is now 34°C and final pressure is 2.1*105Pa

Question asks, Calculate the ratio of new volume to old volume (V1/V2) if the pressure is held constant during the temperature rise stated above.

Homework Equations


General Gas Equation

(P1V1)/T1= (P2V2)/T2

The Attempt at a Solution


Using the general gas Equation I worked out the final pressure of 2.1*105Pa which was not orignially given.

Now for the ratio my idea is as follows

If the pressure is held constant, then V1/T1= V2/T2 which is a statement of charles Law.

I'm not sure how to find the ratio but perhaps if the ratio of new to old volume would be the same as the ratio between new and old temperature?

SO I would convert the celciusto kelvin by adding 273 and obtain 296 Kelvin initial temperature, and 307 K final temperature

Then I would do this 307/296 and that would give me 1.04 to two significant figures as the ratio.

Is this correct? I would like some assistance.
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
Richie Smash said:
perhaps if the ratio of new to old volume would be the same as the ratio between new and old temperature?
That is what Charles' Law says. Just rearrange the equation to that form.
Richie Smash said:
Is this correct?
Yes.
 
  • #3
Oh ok thanks alot! I shall re arrange the equation for further clarification
 

1. What does it mean to calculate the ratio of new volume to old volume?

Calculating the ratio of new volume to old volume means determining the relationship between the new volume and the original volume of an object or substance. It is a mathematical process that involves dividing the new volume by the old volume to determine the proportion or percentage change.

2. Why is it important to calculate the ratio of new volume to old volume?

Calculating the ratio of new volume to old volume is important in many scientific and practical applications. It can help determine the change in size or dimensions of an object, measure the effectiveness of a process or treatment, and assess the growth or shrinkage of a substance. It is also a useful tool for making predictions and comparisons.

3. How do you calculate the ratio of new volume to old volume?

The ratio of new volume to old volume can be calculated by dividing the new volume by the old volume. The resulting number can be expressed as a decimal or a percentage, depending on the desired format. For example, if the new volume is 10 mL and the old volume is 5 mL, the ratio would be 10/5 = 2 or 2:1.

4. What units should be used when calculating the ratio of new volume to old volume?

The units used to measure the volume should remain consistent when calculating the ratio of new volume to old volume. For example, if the new volume is measured in liters, the old volume should also be measured in liters. This ensures accuracy and avoids any confusion when interpreting the ratio.

5. Can the ratio of new volume to old volume be greater than 1?

Yes, the ratio of new volume to old volume can be greater than 1. This indicates that the new volume is larger than the old volume, and there has been an increase in size or quantity. A ratio less than 1 would indicate a decrease in size or quantity.

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