Probably an easy problem for you guys, but hard for me

  • #1

Homework Statement



hi there, im having some trouble with my physics homework and i was wondering if anyone can help me. i have no clue what to do. these are the questions

1. what does the slope of the graph "maximum force of static friction vs normal force" mean? (maximum force of static friction is on the y axis and normal force is on the x axis)

2. use free body diagrams to derive the equation "tanΘ=Us" (Us is static friction)

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Delphi51
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That graph must pass through the origin, so slope = Ff/Fn.
Look through your list of formulas for one containing the two forces and solve it for Ff/Fn. You'll see what it equals.

I'm not familiar with your #2. What is the situation? What is the angle between?
 
  • #3
Andrew Mason
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Homework Statement



hi there, im having some trouble with my physics homework and i was wondering if anyone can help me. i have no clue what to do. these are the questions

1. what does the slope of the graph "maximum force of static friction vs normal force" mean? (maximum force of static friction is on the y axis and normal force is on the x axis)
The slope, which is just the ratio of the maximum static friction force to normal force, gives the proportionality constant for static friction force, [itex]\mu_s[/itex] as in:

[tex]F_{sf} = \mu_sN[/tex]

In the above equation the force of static friction is the maximum force that friction can exert - ie. a force larger than this will cause motion.
2. use free body diagrams to derive the equation "tanΘ=Us" (Us is static friction)
This sounds like a mass on an inclined plane which is tilted until the mass starts to slide. That is the angle, Θ that you use. What is the normal force at that point? What is the force along the surface of the inclined plane? How is that force related to the force of static friction? (think of the forces just before the mass starts to move).

AM
 
  • #4
That graph must pass through the origin, so slope = Ff/Fn.
Look through your list of formulas for one containing the two forces and solve it for Ff/Fn. You'll see what it equals.

I'm not familiar with your #2. What is the situation? What is the angle between?

the situation is a shoe on a wooden board that is 1.85 m long. then it is being lifted up until the shoe starts to move.

tell me if u need more info
 
  • #5
somebody please help with question 2
 
  • #6
Delphi51
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Red, you can do it yourself. I said

"That graph must pass through the origin, so slope = Ff/Fn.
Look through your list of formulas for one containing the two forces and solve it for Ff/Fn. You'll see what it equals."

and Andrew looked up the formula for you, so there is very little left to do!
 
  • #7
Red, you can do it yourself. I said

"That graph must pass through the origin, so slope = Ff/Fn.
Look through your list of formulas for one containing the two forces and solve it for Ff/Fn. You'll see what it equals."

and Andrew looked up the formula for you, so there is very little left to do!

i cant read andrews formulas. its so small and black and white i cant read it. also, im not that good at physics. im only getting a 70sumthing average :(
 
  • #8
ZOMG I THINK I GOT IT.

since slope = Ff/Fn, i can fix up the equation of Ff=uFn to get u=Ff/Fn. am i right?
 
  • #9
Delphi51
Homework Helper
3,407
11
Got it!
Now sketch the shoe on the ramp and draw in the force of gravity vector arrow. Separate that into a part down the ramp and a part into the ramp. Write expressions for those two components. Same for the force of friction.
 
  • #10
thanks alot delphi
 

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