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Problems faced in passenger aircraft

  1. Jul 14, 2014 #1
    Hey Guys,
    Me and my friends are planning to work on a project to solve some real time problem associated with passenger aircrafts.i would like you guys to suggest some problems faced by the industry so that we can solve them.Since i'am an mechanical engineer it would be better if the problem falls within this domain.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 14, 2014 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Since this is your schoolwork project, how about you tell us what your ideas are so far?
     
  4. Jul 14, 2014 #3
    The guy in the window seat keeps getting up and waking me up.
     
  5. Jul 14, 2014 #4

    donpacino

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    I have a problem that you can try to solve... however I want to see your response to berkeman first.
     
  6. Jul 15, 2014 #5
    Actually i came across many problems and i have just noted down some.I'am trying to finilaize on something.

    1)stress reduction in aircrafts.
    2)Reducing chances of overrun of aircrafts.
    3)Ejection type black box on impact which does not sink along with the aircraft but floats.
    4)improving visibility in overcast conditions.
    5)using Kinetic Energy Recovery System(KERS) for taxiiing.
     
  7. Jul 15, 2014 #6

    berkeman

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    I'd be interested in what you mean by the KERS...

    One problem that would be nice to address is how to optimize the placement of carry-on luggage in the overhead bins and at people's feet. Can you think of something that could be done ahead of time before boarding, that would make it much more convenient, orderly and efficient in placing carry-on luggage? I can...
     
  8. Jul 16, 2014 #7

    CWatters

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    Over the years various proposals have been made to reduce fuel consumption of taxiing aircraft. The usual killer is the additional weight. Be sure to factor in the cost of carrying any solution around with the plane.

    OT: A lot of know problems already have technical solutions. What's needed is the political will to implement them. For example it's daft that some cockpit voice recorders have to over write recordings after a few hours because they don't have enough memory!
     
  9. Jul 16, 2014 #8

    donpacino

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    I would go with whatever problem interests you the most.

    The problem I have that you could look into is fuel sloshing. As the aircraft uses fuel the fuel tank empty's, which allows the fuel to move around, or "slosh", in the tank. This changes the dynamics of the aircraft. How can you prevent it.

    I can tell you that to solve #3 you would have to change a whole lot of current FAA and EASA regulations. It would be very difficult to accomplish. However im curious as to what you could come up with.

    Can you elaborate on problem 2 and 5 for me?
     
  10. Jul 16, 2014 #9
    I'm guessing that FAA regulations and procedures are beyond the scope of your homework problem. Anything you do to a commercial airline - especially ATP operations - will involve a lot of FAA scrutiny.
     
  11. Jul 16, 2014 #10


    I appreciate your involvement ! What about a sheet of low-weight material that can prevent the movement of fuel inside the container ? it would be like... that the fuel is full at all times and hence it wont SLOSH !! But We need to rethink the fuel gauge designs again as they depend on the olden tech right ??

    We first came up with a Floater design that would keep the recorders above the water surface ( I assume the crash happens above the oceans...most of the times they are ) but then that became absurd as that would carry it away from the crash site !!
    And then we came up with this..The blackbox be provided with a GPS ( in the existing design ).
    We also thought about an idea of black box fitted with impact sensors !! which will send all the data which it has recorded to the ground station immaediately after impact !! But that would make it complicated !!and Its not our field , so we were afraid to pursue/reject that idea !!

    regarding #2 ... Its an idea of reducing the accidents that occur due to the small length of the runways ! ( Many small airports suffer from these )

    #5... Its is an idea of effectively using the KERS to recover energy from aircraft and to use it during taxiing

    Thanks
     
  12. Jul 16, 2014 #11

    Thank you for the suggestion !! I will try to discuss this with my friends and get to you back shortly ! Ya You can !! and Yeah KERS is a very good concept !! But It increases the weight and complexity of the aircraft !! And WE are trying to overcome its limitations !! You can even share your ideas if you have any !!
     
  13. Jul 16, 2014 #12

    berkeman

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    It's your project, so that's why I made my suggestion in the form of a hint and a question. The rest is up to you and your group's creativity. :smile:
     
  14. Jul 16, 2014 #13
    In order for the black boxes to float, they would need to separate from the aircraft - even after the aircraft has been severely crumpled. Also, the float mechanism would need to inflate even after being subjected to very high G forces and high temperatures. And there should be essentially no chance of the black box separating from the aircraft or the floatation mechanism inflating except during a crash.

    I think you'll find that airports with very short runways, like Washington Reagan, have pretty good safety records. This is because pilots recognize the runway as a problem and make their approach and departure plans accordingly. Factors include:
    * Aircraft type, gross weight
    * Atmospheric conditions - temp, pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction
    * Runway conditions - direction, take off location, obstacles, type of surface, inclination
    * Aircraft configuration - flaps, etc.
    There are apps to assist pilots with these calculations - for both takeoff and landings.

    KERS: Of course, you will be absorbing energy from the braking system and restoring it to the propeller or jet engines - and doing it without adding a lot of weight to the aircraft.
     
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