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Proposed new Sticky: ANSYS Tutorials for Beginners

  1. Sep 12, 2009 #1
    Hello all,

    I use ANSYS at work quite a bit and I know others in the forum propably do also. I mainly model thermal, stress, and combined thermal-stress interactions on all sorts of geometries. I have noticed a lot of the questions asked in here on ANSYS are very simplistic and probably deal with homework assignments more so than actual real world ANSYS models. Therefore, I am willing to start writing some simple tutorials here that illustrate the ANSYS apdl language and the beneficial use of input files. I will not write any tutorials for the ANSYS Workbench environment. I do not use that environment and beginners should not use it either. (In my opinion.)

    Is anyone in favor of this?

    Is anyone else in favor of contributing?

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2009 #2

    FredGarvin

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    Sure. No problem there. There are already some really good tutorial sites out there but I can help contribute as well.
     
  4. Sep 12, 2009 #3
    Thanks Fred.

    I figure that the first post of the sticky would be links to the other tutorial sites then after that we post our tutorials.

    What do you model with ANSYS?

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  5. Sep 12, 2009 #4

    FredGarvin

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    Mostly structural/stress and modal. I occasionally do a thermal analysis but they are few and far between.
     
  6. Sep 13, 2009 #5
    Excellent idea Matt:smile:

    But it would be much more helpful to newbies if you started with a bit of theory, & then on to some tuts to elaborate the idea. You know, like start with a bit of intro to the mathematical approach, element equation formulation, element types, solver types. Just a thought:smile:
     
  7. Sep 13, 2009 #6
    Depends on the level of theory, its either very simple or very hard.

    I can dig out my notes on FEA theory, contains the basics and stuff on solver types, and matrix fomation.
     
  8. Sep 14, 2009 #7
    I think that the theory of FEA should have a sticky or a blog all on its own. I don't want to have the readers looking through alot of theory, which can be very complex with (perhaps) confusing indicial notation that most BS students can't follow. I say we keep it simple and straightforward.

    Ok, so how does one create a sticky?

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  9. Sep 14, 2009 #8

    minger

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    I would have to disagree with you regarding the Workbench environment, ESPECIALLY if you're using the new version 12. While the WB environment doesn't have all of the options that APDL (the ANSYS formerly known as Classic), it does have most of them, which can be input through Command snippets.

    In addition to that, geometry modification via DesignModeler can be extremely useful. Finally, at least the files inside of the WB "object" allows load and result transfer between different analyses extremely easy (no more creating surface elements and writing out CDB files).

    p.s. I do typically use APDL though as I typically start with an axisymmetric model, and the visualization is better in APDL than in WB for that.

    edit: Either way, good idea, I would also recommend any newb to check out the XANSYS forum, and Sheldon Imaoka's website at ansys.net
     
  10. Sep 14, 2009 #9
    Yes, I am just not a fan of the command snippets. WB has come a long way since it was first introduced. I guess I am just old school. LOL

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  11. Sep 14, 2009 #10

    minger

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    A lot of people here are too. I'm fairly new to commercial FEA software, so I'm slightly more open to new things. I personally like to set everything up using an APDL input file. Then, I open a new WB project, and import my model into design modeler. From there, I export that to an APDL analysis. Its basically exactly what I did before, but now since it's in a workbench environment, I can pass the project off to someone else who can then implement analysis in their area.

    I just HATED trying to line up models between different disciplines (why oh WHY must ANSYS require Y-axial for axisymmetric models!?!), and then trying to get boundary conditions, etc, etc.

    Also, if you haven't checked it out, v12 allows for rotordynamics using nearly any element type. It used to be only pipes, which was a pain the ***, there was really no point in using it over other softwares. Now, general axisymmetric 272/273 elements with COMBIN214 elements, and you have a FAST way to get critical speeds from a complicated shaft geometry.
     
  12. Sep 15, 2009 #11
    No, I haven't checked out the rotordynamics. I don't model rotating equipment. However, I will keep it in mind for the critical speed calculations. Thanks.

    So how do we go about posting a sticky?

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  13. Oct 8, 2009 #12
    Can any one point me in the direction of how to create a "sticky"?

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  14. Oct 9, 2009 #13
    I guess sending a PM to a Mod(astronuc or russ maybe) should do it. If that doesn't work, Greg can do it(he is the boss i believe).
     
  15. Oct 9, 2009 #14

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Start an ANSYS tutorial and we'll sticky it.

    An ANSYS tutorial/discussion thread sounds good to me.

    I can also move this thread to Feedback to avoid confusion with the ANSYS tutorial thread.
     
  16. Oct 9, 2009 #15

    FredGarvin

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    Matt,
    What have you covered so far for the sticky? I would not want to cover something that you already have.
     
  17. Oct 9, 2009 #16
    Fred,

    Nothing yet, now that I know how to proceed, I was going to start with some simple 2D static structural simulations.

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  18. Oct 9, 2009 #17

    minger

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    I can share my trials and tribulations with the fantastically documented (ha!) Rotordynamic analysis.
     
  19. Oct 9, 2009 #18
    minger,

    Sounds great. I think even us more experienced users are going to learn alot doing this sticky.

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  20. Jan 11, 2010 #19
    Hello again,

    I haven't let this die out. I have been over run at work these past few months and haven't had much time to be on the forum.

    I will have ANSYS 12.1 up and running this week and I now have the time to do these tutorials.

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  21. Jan 11, 2010 #20

    minger

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    You're going to love the new Workbench project schematic.
     
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