Push-Pull Amplifier Homework: Calculate Vcc, R Input & Gain

  • Thread starter Unskilled
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Amplifier
In summary, the conversation discusses calculating Vcc and Vee, input resistance, and voltage gain for an effect amplifier circuit. The values for Vcc and Vee should be around 14-16, the input resistance should be high, and no calculation is needed for the voltage gain. The person also mentions their attempt at solving the problem, using the equation P=U^2/(2*R) and finding a value for Vcc that is less than 14. They also express confusion about how to calculate the input resistance and voltage gain. They request a clearer circuit for better understanding.
  • #1
Unskilled
12
0

Homework Statement


1. Calculate Vcc and Vee(should be around 14-16).
2. Calculate the input resistance. (You should get a high value).
3. Determine the voltage gain. No calculation is needed.

http://img210.imageshack.us/my.php?image=effectampqe2.jpg


Ucesat = 1 V
Poutmax = 10 W
Rl = 8 ohm
Icq9=Icq11=40mA
Re=0.47 ohm
R8=R9=1000 ohm
Vbe=0.7V


2. The attempt at a solution
1. I used P=U^2/(2*R)=>U=sqrt(P*2*R)=sqrt(10*2*8)=12.65V
Vcc=U+Ucesat=12.65+1=13.65 but this is less than 14.

2.Here i don't know how to start.

3.I don't know how to solve this either.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Can you please repost a clear circuit. It's hard to see. Thanks.
 
  • #3


I would first like to commend you for attempting to solve this problem on your own. It shows that you are actively engaged in your learning and are willing to put in the effort to understand the material. However, I would like to provide some guidance to help you better understand this concept.

1. To calculate Vcc and Vee, we can use the formula P = V^2/R. Since we are given the maximum output power (Poutmax) and the load resistance (Rl), we can rearrange the formula to solve for V. This gives us V = sqrt(Poutmax*Rl) = sqrt(10*8) = 8.94V. However, this is the voltage across the load, so we need to add the voltage drop across the collector-emitter junction (Ucesat) to get the total supply voltage. Therefore, Vcc = V + Ucesat = 8.94 + 1 = 9.94V. Similarly, Vee = V - Ucesat = 8.94 - 1 = 7.94V. These values are within the range of 14-16V mentioned in the problem statement.

2. The input resistance can be calculated using the formula Rinput = Vbe/Ib, where Vbe is the base-emitter voltage and Ib is the base current. In this case, Vbe is given as 0.7V and the base current can be calculated using Ohm's Law (Ib = V/R). The resistance R is the parallel combination of R8 and R9, which can be calculated as R = (R8*R9)/(R8+R9). Substituting all the values, we get Rinput = 0.7/(0.7/(1000*1000)/(1000+1000)) = 2M ohm. This is a high value, as expected for an amplifier.

3. The voltage gain can be determined by looking at the circuit diagram. This is a push-pull amplifier, which means the output voltage is the sum of the voltages from two transistors (Q9 and Q11). Since they are in opposite phases, the output voltage is amplified. Therefore, the voltage gain is approximately equal to the number of turns in the transformer (N = 1 in this case). No calculation is needed, but it is important to understand how the amplifier
 

Related to Push-Pull Amplifier Homework: Calculate Vcc, R Input & Gain

1. What is a push-pull amplifier?

A push-pull amplifier is a type of electronic amplifier circuit that uses two active devices, typically transistors, to amplify an input signal. The two devices work together to "push" and "pull" the output voltage, resulting in a more efficient and higher quality amplification.

2. How do I calculate Vcc?

Vcc, also known as the collector supply voltage, can be calculated by adding the maximum collector voltage (Vc) and the desired collector-to-emitter voltage (Vce). This value is typically determined by the specifications of the active devices used in the amplifier circuit.

3. What is the R input in a push-pull amplifier?

The R input, or input resistance, is the total resistance seen by the input signal in the amplifier circuit. It is important to choose the appropriate R input value to ensure that the input signal is not attenuated or distorted.

4. How do I calculate gain in a push-pull amplifier?

The gain of a push-pull amplifier can be calculated by dividing the change in output voltage by the change in input voltage. This value is typically represented in decibels (dB) and can be determined by the specifications of the active devices and the overall design of the amplifier circuit.

5. Are there any limitations to using a push-pull amplifier?

While push-pull amplifiers offer many advantages, such as high efficiency and low distortion, they do have some limitations. These include the complexity of the circuit design, the need for matched active devices, and the possibility of unwanted oscillations. It is important to carefully consider these factors when designing and using a push-pull amplifier.

Similar threads

  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
24
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
25
Views
8K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
2
Replies
49
Views
6K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
9K
Back
Top