Question about 'Entropy-driven'

  • Thread starter wangasu
  • Start date
In summary, entropy-driven processes refer to systems without a change in enthalpy. This includes isolated systems like the universe. However, the term "entropy-driven" is also used in some biological or mesoscopic systems. Entropy is not a physical thing that drives processes, but rather energy is the driving force. The change in entropy of a process determines whether it will occur naturally or if energy needs to be added. A positive change in entropy leads to a dispersal of energy in a system, while a negative change requires energy to be added for the process to occur.
  • #1
wangasu
33
0
Does anybody know about the entropy-driven processes? Are they referred to the systems without enthapy change? so, all the isolated systems like the universe belong to the category. but, I also noticed that the term, entropy-driven, was used in some biological or mesoscopic systems. What is it really all about? Thank you.
 
Science news on Phys.org
  • #2
wangasu said:
Does anybody know about the entropy-driven processes? Are they referred to the systems without enthapy change? so, all the isolated systems like the universe belong to the category. but, I also noticed that the term, entropy-driven, was used in some biological or mesoscopic systems. What is it really all about? Thank you.
Entropy is not a concrete physical thing so it does not really drive anything. Energy is the ability to apply a force over a distance (work). Energy drives things. The entropy change of a process tells us whether the process will occur naturally by itself (ie. change in entropy is > 0) or whether energy must be added to make the process occur (entropy < 0). If a change in entropy of a process is > 0, the process results in energy of a system becoming more disperse. If entropy change of a system < 0, energy in the system becomes more concentrated (this can only occur if energy is added).

AM
 
  • #3


Yes, I am familiar with entropy-driven processes. Entropy is a measure of the disorder or randomness in a system. In thermodynamics, entropy-driven processes refer to physical or chemical reactions that occur spontaneously due to an increase in entropy. This means that the system becomes more disordered or random as the reaction proceeds.

In isolated systems, such as the universe, there is no exchange of energy or matter with the surroundings. Therefore, any processes that occur in these systems are driven solely by changes in entropy.

In biological and mesoscopic systems, entropy-driven processes can refer to the increase in disorder or randomness that occurs during cellular processes or in smaller scale systems. For example, protein folding and enzyme reactions are often driven by changes in entropy.

Overall, entropy-driven processes are important in understanding the behavior of various systems, from isolated systems like the universe to biological systems at the cellular level. I hope this helps to clarify the concept for you.
 

Related to Question about 'Entropy-driven'

What is entropy-driven?

Entropy-driven refers to a process or phenomenon where the increase in entropy is the driving force or cause of the observed behavior or change.

What is the role of entropy in chemical reactions?

In chemical reactions, entropy plays a crucial role in determining the direction and spontaneity of the reaction. A reaction will tend to proceed in the direction that increases the overall entropy of the system.

What is the relationship between entropy and disorder?

Entropy is often associated with disorder because an increase in entropy usually leads to a more disordered or random state. However, it's important to note that entropy is a measure of energy dispersal and not necessarily a measure of disorder.

Can entropy be reversed?

No, according to the second law of thermodynamics, the total entropy of a closed system will always either remain constant or increase. This means that entropy cannot be reversed.

How is entropy related to the arrow of time?

Entropy is closely linked to the concept of the arrow of time, which refers to the one-way direction of time. The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy will always increase with time, which is why we perceive time as moving forward and not backward.

Similar threads

Replies
12
Views
2K
Replies
13
Views
2K
Replies
17
Views
2K
Replies
15
Views
1K
  • Thermodynamics
Replies
3
Views
847
  • Thermodynamics
Replies
1
Views
795
Replies
19
Views
6K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
891
Back
Top