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Question: Does and/or Can Gravity exist indepent of objects?

  1. Jun 5, 2010 #1
    Question: Does and/or Can Gravity exist indepent of objects?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 5, 2010 #2

    russ_watters

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    Re: Gravity

    Welcome to PF.

    Gravity results from mass.
     
  4. Jun 5, 2010 #3
    Re: Gravity

    Okay, so it is dependent of objects.

    So how does mass create gravity?
     
  5. Jun 5, 2010 #4

    russ_watters

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    Re: Gravity

    The exact mechanism is unknown. Ultimately, that is the way it is for fundamental forces like gravity and magnetism.
     
  6. Jun 5, 2010 #5

    arildno

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    Re: Gravity

    We know the general manner of how gravity will affect masses, and that is all we need to make effective predictions and suchlike.

    But why masses interdepend through the force of gravity in the first place, this is, as russ have said, a big unknown.
     
  7. Jun 5, 2010 #6
    Re: Gravity

    If gravity is the product of objects, then, does gravity itself contain mass?
     
  8. Jun 5, 2010 #7

    russ_watters

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    Re: Gravity

    No. That doesn't follow logically.
     
  9. Jun 5, 2010 #8
    Re: Gravity

    Maybe my question wasn't a logical flow of thought. So here is what I'm trying to understand. Since you brought up the subject of Magnetism earlier, maybe this will help.
    I can vaguely comprehend how magnetism force works and how it may not contain mass. I understand that two magnetic and electrically charged objects are attracted to each other. But, by comparison, can you elaborate a bit further how gravity works? How one object relates to another one by way of a gravitational force? Please understand I am not a physicist, so give me the layman's short version, please.
     
  10. Jun 5, 2010 #9

    russ_watters

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    Re: Gravity

    Could you explain it to me? I haven't got a clue!
    Not really, no. I'm afraid the answers you seek do not exist.
     
  11. Jun 5, 2010 #10
    Re: Gravity

    Thank You for trying to answer my question.
     
  12. Jun 5, 2010 #11
    Re: Gravity

    Has anyone ever considered whether gravity is a consequence of the expansion of the universe?

    The thought experiment goes like this: If the universe is expanding, then matter must remain the same size, or we would not even notice the expansion; so is gravity matter's way of resisting expansion?
     
  13. Jun 5, 2010 #12
    Re: Gravity

    One way that gravity can be explained is as the curvature of space. Mass curves space around it the way a bowling ball would curve a bed spring, and other masses fall into the crevice created. This is a slightly more detailed explanation of how it works but fundamentally the answer is still "we don't know why."
     
  14. Jun 6, 2010 #13
    Re: Gravity

    ""curve a bed spring,""
    I think you mean a bed mattress.

    Imagine a mattress in the shape of a hollow sphere.
    Make it spin.
    Centrifugal force will make any masses inside press into the mattress.
    These are the analogy with the curvature of space.
    The masses roll or slide into each others dips in the mattress.
    They appear to attract each other.
    This is gravity.
    Our universe is very large ,is 4 dimensional and may be spinning.
    We are inside the universe.
     
  15. Jun 6, 2010 #14
    Re: Gravity

    Linda:

    While in everyday life, gravity results from mass, in relativity, ala Einstein, gravity results from mass, energy and pressure.

    In everyday, Newtonian, physics gravity is teated [approximately, but very accurately as a force. But Einstein discovered a more accurate description of gravity as the bending of space, and oddly, time rather than as a conventional "force".

    As John Wheeler said
    "Mass tell space how to curve, space tells mass how to move." (or something close to that)

    which is a simplified version using "space" instead of "spacetime"...

    Newtonian, or force based gravity, works well for the movement of planets and spaceships and the trajectory of a baseball for example, but fails horribly for GPS navigation systems and around black holes where relativistic effects must be taken into account.

    We now know that space, time and gravity are interwoven, that is, related to each other and affect each other, but why that is remains a mystery.
     
  16. Jun 6, 2010 #15
    Re: Gravity

    I meant bed spring. I dunno why you would differentiate between the two or think i confused the two. In the example i gave nothing is spinning. Everything is in free fall and gravity curves space around massive objects causing other objects to fall into them. If the universe were spinning it would need to be spinning relative to something else.
     
  17. Jun 6, 2010 #16
    Re: Gravity

    The cosmological constant has no effect on mass since particle forces totally over whlem the cosmological force which is evident only on intergalactic distances.....
    so while you idea is potentially interesting, it does not seem to predict nor explain much.
     
  18. Jun 6, 2010 #17
    Re: Gravity

    Okay, I have another question. If space, time and gravity are related to each other, is it possible to have one, or two but not the third? In other words, can space exist without gravity? Time without space? Gravity without Time? etc.

    I'm wondering, also, does a black hole contain such a thing as space? I'm thinking that anything that got close to a black hole would be crushed beneath the weight of gravity, am I right? Crushed as in, nothing left but pure matter and no space?
     
  19. Jun 6, 2010 #18
    Re: Gravity

    No one really knows what happens inside black holes but they do take up space. A black hole is a sphere bounded by its event horizon, which is the point at which nothing inside can escape it. This radius of the sphere is directly proportional to the mass of the black hole, and so the sphere's volume increases as more mass is added.
     
  20. Jun 15, 2010 #19
    Re: Gravity

    Just curious why there is no gravity or very little outside earth's orbit, but yet every planet is bound by the suns gravity? Is the sun's gravity very weak on small objects & only a planet sized object feels its pull?
     
  21. Jun 15, 2010 #20

    D H

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    Re: Gravity

    What makes you think this?
     
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