Recargeable batteries/charger compatibility

  • Thread starter Danger
  • Start date
In summary, the charger has four slots for AA batteries, and one slot for AAA batteries. The Duracell batteries are the only ones that will work in the charger. The charger is compatible with Energizer AA's and AAA's. The USB port is for charging devices.
  • #1
Danger
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Berkeman, I figure that you'll be the first one in on this. I would have just PM'd you about it, but my box is full and the topic might be of interest to others.
With the number of things around our place that run on AA or AAA batteries, from my toy helicopter to W's... toothbrush :rolleyes:... I just shelled out about a hundred bucks for a bunch of rechargeable NiMH cells in those sizes.
When reading the package for the charger, it said that recharging times would be dependent upon the type and brand of battery. Once I got home and opened the package, the instructions inside say that I can use only Duracell batteries in the charger. That seems contradictory to the package. Since there were no Duracell rechargeables for sale other than the 4 in the charger pack, I bought Energizers to go with it. Is there any reason, other than trying to sell more Duracells, that I shouldn't use them?
Available specs are:

Charger: Duracell model CEF21/1.6 VDC 400 mA for each of 4 AA slots/1.6 VDC 175 mA for each of 4 AAA slots/5 VDC 500 mA on the USB port
Duracell Batteries: AA/HR6/DC1500 NiMH/1,2V/1700mAh
Energizer AA's: 2000 mAh
Energizer AAA's: 900 mAh

Those are the only figures that I could find, and are directly quoted from the printing (including the comma rather than period in the '1,2V' spec).

Is it safe to use the Energizers with the Duracell charger? And, by the way, what the hell is that 5V USB port for? :confused:
 
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  • #2
Danger said:
Is there any reason, other than trying to sell more Duracells, that I shouldn't use them?
Apart from the image of poor starving Duracell executives..

And, by the way, what the hell is that 5V USB port for? :confused:
Lots of stuff charges from USB (my mobile bluetooth headset) so they put a spare USB socket on the charger because it already has the regulated dv supply.
 
  • #3
As long as you're using the same battery chemistry (NiMH), it'll work fine. They may have some cheap-out clause where they won't warranty the product unless you use their branded batteries, but it makes absolutely no difference.

The USB port is for charging devices (like iPods) which usually charge via a USB port. It's a convenience.

- Warren
 
  • #4
Thanks, guys. I figured it would be safe, but since we don't have fire insurance on our place...
More about the USB thing, though. The only battery operated device that I own with a USB port is my camera. It draws power from the computer when uploading pictures. Does this mean that I can recharge the batteries in the camera by plugging the upload cable into the charger USB port?
 
  • #5
That would depend on the camera. Most small form-factor cameras purposefully do not include built-in charging circuitry because it would make the camera larger. Instead, they put the charging circuitry into a separate wall-wart type unit separate from the camera.

Even if the camera can run using the 5V from the USB port, I'd put the odds at below 50/50 that it can actually charge its battery that way. Check your manual.

- Warren
 
  • #6
The manual wouldn't cover it, Chroot. The thing just uses disposable batteries, and doesn't have it's own charger. It's a little Vivitar that I got in a package deal with a Lexmark printer (which I've never used) about 4 years ago. I'm going to start using the rechargeables in it (if I ever again see anything worth taking a picture of), so I thought that the USB might be a short-cut to loading them up. Thanks again for the info.
 
  • #7
If it's intended to use disposable batteries, then it's certain that it contains no charging circuitry. After all, there are many different rechargeable battery chemistries available in the AA standard size, and each requires a different charging profile.

- Warren
 
  • #8
Yeah, I'm not sure why I missed that aspect of it. Maybe I should start having just 3 or 4 beers for breakfast instead of 10... :redface:
I've got to face it... I'm a child of the 50's. I still think of Aerosmith as a new band. This tech stuff just keeps me off balance.
 

Related to Recargeable batteries/charger compatibility

1. What is the difference between a rechargeable battery and a regular battery?

A rechargeable battery is designed to be reused multiple times by recharging it with electricity, while a regular battery is designed to be used once and then disposed of.

2. Can I use any charger with my rechargeable batteries?

No, it is important to use a charger that is compatible with your specific type of rechargeable battery. Using the wrong charger can damage the battery or cause it to malfunction.

3. How can I tell if my charger is compatible with my rechargeable batteries?

You can check the specifications of your charger and compare them to the specifications of your rechargeable batteries. The voltage and charging current should match or be within the recommended range.

4. Can I mix different brands of rechargeable batteries in my charger?

It is generally recommended to use the same brand and type of rechargeable batteries in a charger. Mixing different brands can affect the charging capacity and may lead to overcharging or undercharging.

5. Is it safe to leave my rechargeable batteries in the charger after they are fully charged?

It is not recommended to leave rechargeable batteries in the charger after they are fully charged. This can cause overcharging, which can reduce the battery's lifespan and potentially cause it to overheat or leak.

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