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Recommend a fluid mechanics book

  1. Dec 15, 2005 #1
    As part of my chemical engineering degree I have to do a module called fluid flow. Turns out i'm pretty bad at it. I'm trying to find a book which covers as much of the module as possible, with plenty of worked examples.


    The syllabus:

    Introductory concepts of fluids, units & dimensions, hydrostatics.

    Flow, flow regimes, conservation of mass and energy, Bernoulli's equation,
    flow measurement.

    Conservation of momentum, force-momentum balances, forces on pipework, friction in pipe flows, friction factor, The Moody chart,
    rating & designing pipelines.

    Flow around objects.
    Drag.
    Laminar flow, Newton's law of viscosity, Hagen-Poiseuille equation, Pumps, Types, selection,characteristic curves, NPSH.



    Can anyone recommend a book or books?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 15, 2005 #2

    FredGarvin

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    That's pretty much covered in any Fluid Mechanics text. If you need practice examples, I'd look into Schaum's Outlines. They briefly cover theory and have a lot of problems worked out. If you do some searching on Google you'll find that there are a lot of engineering fluids references on line, in web sites.

    As another thought, in regards to pumps, if you want to get deep into the theory behind pumps, especially centrifugals, you may consider a separate book for that. Something along the lines of The Pump Handbook by Karassik, Krutzsch, Fraser and Messina.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2005
  4. Dec 16, 2005 #3

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    You're basically after a slightly more engineering-oriented textbook than a "theoretical" one.
    For example, a good "theoretical" book that will be of minor use to you is Batchelor's book; so take care to see that the book you're after covers the topics you want.
     
  5. Dec 17, 2005 #4
    How do you guys feel about Denn's Process Fluid Mechanics? It is being used in my next undergraduate course and it seems a bit small, should I be looking for a supplement?

    thx.
     
  6. Dec 21, 2005 #5

    Clausius2

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    ...and keep in mind that although that Batchelor's book is entitled as "Introductory Fluid Mechanics", it is NOT as introductory as one might expect....
     
  7. Dec 21, 2005 #6

    arildno

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    Well, it DOES start out from the "basics" like thermodynamics and so on..:wink:
     
  8. Dec 21, 2005 #7

    Astronuc

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    Here are two lists of books on Fluid Dynamics/Fluid Mechanics.

    1. Batchelor, G.K. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics, Cambridge Univsrsity Press 1967
    2. Landau and Lifsh!tz, Fluid Mechanis (2nd Ed.), Pergamon Press 1987.
    3. Milne-Thomson, L.M. Theoretical Hydrodynamics, McMillan (3rd or 5th Ed.) 1955 (3rd).
    4. Lighthill, M.J. An Informal Introduction to Theoretical Fluid Mechanics, Clarendon Press 1986.
    5. Prandtl, L. Essential of Fluid Dynamics, Hafner 1952.
    6. Lamb, Hydrodynamics (6th Ed.), Cambridge University Press 1932
    7. Courant and Freidrichs, Supersonic Flow and Sock Waves, Interscience 1948.
    8. Meyer, An Introduction to Mathematical Fluids Dynamics, Dover 1971.


    Pedlosky, J., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Springer Verlag
    (complements Gill, emphasizing QG dynamics, Rossby waves, baroclinic instability, non-dimensional scaling)
    James, I.N. Introduction to Circulating Atmospheres, Oxford Univ. Press (good basic discussion of modern atmospheric circulation dynamics)
    many good review papers on GFD of A and O can be found in Annual Reviews of Fluid Mechanics, a yearly hard-bound collection.
    Meteorology at the Millenium, R.B.Pearce Ed., Academic Press (a recent collection of review papers on atmospheric circulation some with a GFD emphasis).
    Large-Scale Dynamical Processes in the Atmosphere. Academic Press, Hoskins and Pearce Eds. (an old (1983) yet still excellent set of review papers on basic circulation)
    Evolution of Physical Oceanography MIT Press,Warren and Wunsch Eds. (also old, ca. 1981, yet excellent review papers on physical oceanography, general circulation).
    Acheson, D. Elementary Fluid Mechanics, Oxford Univ. Press (excellent, terse introduction to classical fluid mechanics)

    Lighthill, M.J., An informal introduction to theoretical fluid mechanics. Oxford Univ. Press (especially expert discussion by a master of vorticity, and of sound propagation)
    Lighthill, M.J., Waves in Fluids. Cambridge Univ. Press (basic wave mathematics, of non-dispersive and dispersive wave types; ray-tracing; internal and Rossby waves).
    Whitham, G.B. Linear and Nonlinear Waves. Wiley and Sons (a remarkable presentation of non-dispersive and dispersive waves from a fundamental mathematical point of view).
    Salmon, R., Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Oxford Univ. Press (another remarkable, recent text treating mostly large-scale QG oceanic GFD but with

    fundamental ideas about fluid dynamics based on Hamilton’s principle)
    James, I., Introduction to Circulating Atmospheres (readable discussion of basic GFD of the large-scale atmosphere)
    Batchelor,G.K., An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics, Cambridge Univ. Press (impeccable reference on basic incompressible fluids, vorticity, strain, boundary layers)
    Kundu,P. Fluid Dynamics, Academic Press (includes sections on elementary GFD)
    Tritton, D., Physical Fluid Dynamics (basic fluids from a GFD point of view).
    Van Dyke,M. An Album of Fluid Motion, Parabolic Press (amazing photographs of basic fluid dynamics).

    Landau and Lifsh!tz, Fluid Mechanics, Second Edition : Volume 6 (Course of Theoretical Physics) Not too expensive, and it seems reasonably comprehensive.
     
  9. Dec 22, 2005 #8

    Clausius2

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    Also a vertical wall has a beginning just in its junction with the floor.:cool:
     
  10. Dec 22, 2005 #9
    Check out the eFunda.com web site.
    Thanks,
    Gordan
     
  11. Jan 2, 2006 #10
  12. Jan 5, 2006 #11
    I used Fluid Flow for Chemical Engineers by Holland and Bragg.
    It was pretty strong. And cheap.
     
  13. Feb 3, 2012 #12
    I wold suggest that can use potto project book.
    It is very good.
    Probably it is the best chapter on hydrostatics.
    you can it for free at www.potto.org
     
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