Relationship between d.c. volts and electrolysis in steel

In summary, a 10v a.c. signal is used to power a small steel sensor (SMO 254) in wastewater. The control device checks for a conductive path to ground to determine the liquid level over the sensor. D.c. is not used to avoid electrolysis, but there may still be a d.c. component that could cause the sensor to corrode over time. To find the relationship between d.c. voltage and electrolysis effect, one can look for the polarization curve for SMO 254.
  • #1
stevecarson
4
0
We use a 10v a.c. signal through to a small steel sensor (SMO 254) in wastewater - and the control device looks for a conductive path to ground to determine that the level of liquid is over the sensor.

We don't use d.c. because of the electrolysis effect - but the circuit we use could have a d.c. component - which might mean that over a period of time the sensor gets eaten away.

Is there a graph or formula for increases in d.c. voltage vs electrolysis effect (e.g. mm/yr)?

Thanks
Steve
Brisbane
 
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  • #2
One probably wants to find the polarization curve, i.e. applied potential vs log I (current), for SMO 254.
 
  • #3


The relationship between d.c. volts and electrolysis in steel is a complex one and cannot be represented by a simple graph or formula. This is because the rate of electrolysis is affected by various factors such as the composition and properties of the steel, the type and concentration of electrolyte, and the specific conditions of the environment in which the steel is placed.

However, it is known that higher d.c. voltages can lead to increased rates of electrolysis in steel. This is because d.c. voltage creates an electric current that flows through the steel and causes an exchange of ions between the steel and the electrolyte. This exchange can lead to the formation of corrosion products on the surface of the steel, which can result in the degradation of the steel over time.

In the context of your specific application, using a 10v a.c. signal is a wise choice to avoid excessive electrolysis and potential damage to the sensor. It is important to regularly monitor the condition of the sensor and replace it if signs of corrosion or degradation are observed. Additionally, proper maintenance and control of the electrolyte concentration can also help mitigate the effects of electrolysis.

In summary, while there is no specific formula or graph for the relationship between d.c. voltage and electrolysis in steel, it is important to carefully consider the potential effects of d.c. voltage in your application and take appropriate measures to prevent damage to the steel sensor.
 

What is the relationship between d.c. volts and electrolysis in steel?

The relationship between d.c. volts and electrolysis in steel is that the higher the voltage, the faster the rate of electrolysis in steel. This is because a higher voltage provides more energy for the electrolysis process, resulting in a faster reaction.

How does d.c. voltage affect the electrolysis process in steel?

D.C. voltage plays a crucial role in the electrolysis process in steel. It provides the energy necessary to break down the steel's chemical bonds and facilitate the movement of ions. Without a sufficient voltage, the electrolysis process will not occur.

What happens to the steel during electrolysis at different d.c. voltages?

At different d.c. voltages, the steel will undergo varying degrees of electrolysis. At lower voltages, the electrolysis process will be slower and less noticeable. However, at higher voltages, the steel may experience visible changes such as rusting or corrosion.

Can electrolysis in steel occur without d.c. voltage?

No, electrolysis in steel cannot occur without d.c. voltage. The process of electrolysis requires an external source of energy to drive the chemical reaction. D.C. voltage provides this energy and is essential for electrolysis to occur in steel.

Is there a limit to how much d.c. voltage can be applied to steel for electrolysis?

Yes, there is a limit to how much d.c. voltage can be applied to steel for electrolysis. Applying too high of a voltage can result in damaging the steel and causing it to break down or even explode. It is important to use caution and follow safety guidelines when using d.c. voltage for electrolysis in steel.

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