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B Relationship between Higgs particles and gravitons?

  1. Jun 1, 2017 #1
    In trying to understand the relationship between Higgs particles and gravitons, I would like to pose a question on hypothetical question:

    What would happen if you increase the Higgs field around a planet? It seems it would mean its mass increases, which would mean its gravitation increases, right? So if we assume gravitons exist, how does increased interaction with the Higgs field cause it to emit more gravitons? Or would it just have more mass, without necessarily more gravitational attraction?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 1, 2017 #2
    I think you are misunderstanding the term "field" in this sense, it's a bit of an overloaded term. A "field" in the general physics sense is essentially a value attached to each point in space. It is not something that can be "extended", since it is part of the fabric of all spacetime anyway. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(physics)

    That Higgs field is just a mechanism for some particles to obtain mass that otherwise wouldn't, and it's also not the main source of mass as we know it anyway (kinetic energy is the biggest contributor afaik).
     
  4. Jun 2, 2017 #3

    mfb

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    You cannot "increase the Higgs field around a planet", or at least it is unclear what that means.

    A planet that is not accelerated doesn't emit gravitons (assuming they exist), in the same way as an electron does not emit photons unless it gets accelerated.

    If you increase the total energy of a planet in its rest frame, you increase its gravitational attraction.
     
  5. Jun 2, 2017 #4

    I understand. I guess my question was that what would happen if the Higgs had a slightly higher field energy than now? Forget the planet example. Let's say there is a different universe with a slightly higher Higgs density/field energy. It seems it would increase the mass of the same amount of material. But In that hypothetical universe would the gravitational attraction of the same amount of material increase as well, or would you just have a different gravitational constant, perhaps lower, to compensate for the higher masses in this universe?
     
  6. Jun 2, 2017 #5

    mfb

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    We don't know if the gravitational constant and the Higgs mechanism are connected in any way.

    We also don't know if the coupling constants and the vacuum expectation value (vev) are linked in any way, and both are important for particle masses. You could increase the vev and leave the particle masses unchanged.
     
  7. Jun 2, 2017 #6
    I see. Thank you.
     
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