Repairing a rear-screen projection TV

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In summary, this Toshiba TV has wavy lines on the screen and may need to be repaired. It is difficult to do so without the help of a professional, and may require the replacement of a component. Testing the circuit board by yourself may be difficult.
  • #1
DaveC426913
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I've got this Toshiba 42H82 TV that the cat dragged in. Attached is a quick rough pic of what it's doing. I know it's difficult (and potentially dangerous) to repair a TV and wouldn't attempt to do it without a friend who knows his electronic repairs.

Can this kind of thing be repaired? Ideas?
 

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  • #2
I had asearch for projection screen and wavy lines and it looks like a capacitor failure on one of the boards from what some other people have said.

http://www.fixya.com/support/t294387-toshiba_50h12_rear_projection_tv_wavy

http://en.allexperts.com/q/TV-VCR-Stereo-1749/Toshiba-Projection-Wavy-Lines.htm

Seems to occur to 4 year old Toshibas a lot. I'd still seek professional opinion however.
 
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  • #3
no really a tv repair person myself, but it sort of looks like a sync problem. horizontal at least, and vert if it's "rolling". if you can find a burst capacitor by inspection, consider yourself a very lucky nerd.

another thing that techs sometimes do (more like did) is run around and reflow all the solder joints. occasionally, you get what's called a cold solder joint with stress fractures and high impedance. but with newer surface mount components, I'm not sure this will be an option for you.
 
  • #4
Kurdt's links look useful.

Be sure to use a big enough Isolation Transformer when working with exposed AC Mains (and higher voltages!) like in TVs. And be sure your electronics friend can explain to you why an Iso is important...

Also beware of high voltages being held on capacitors -- they can surprise you long after the TV is turned off. Do you have a SAMS Photofacts for the TV? You really need one of those before you start digging into the TV. Also, what is the anode voltage for the projection CRTs?

EDIT -- Hmmm, doesn't seem to have a SAMS Photofacts edition for that TV... Toshiba may not be cooperating...

http://www.samswebsite.com/description.asp?ID=Photofact
 
  • #5
Cool. I'm finding the same links.
 
  • #6
If you can eyeball and find a defective component sometimes you can replace it. Heating soldered connections and resoldering a new component can easily ruin adjacent components...so use a modest size soldering appliance.

I'm not expert either, but it looks like the projection illumination buld is still good..those can be quite expensive...if you buy a replacement circuit board and you open the package you'll own it...so check if the board you suspect is an expensive one...testing circuit boards on your own is typically not easy...if you have specs and test values and enough spare time and interest, it's not so bad.
 

Related to Repairing a rear-screen projection TV

1. How do I know if my rear-screen projection TV needs repair?

Some common signs that your rear-screen projection TV may need repair include a distorted or blurry image, strange noises coming from the TV, or the TV not turning on at all. If you notice any of these issues, it is best to have a professional technician diagnose and repair the problem.

2. Can I repair my rear-screen projection TV myself?

While there are some basic troubleshooting steps you can try, such as checking the cables and connections or resetting the TV, it is not recommended to attempt to repair a rear-screen projection TV yourself. These TVs contain complex technology and require specialized knowledge and tools to properly diagnose and fix any issues.

3. How much does it cost to repair a rear-screen projection TV?

The cost of repairing a rear-screen projection TV can vary depending on the specific issue and the brand of the TV. On average, repairs can range from $100 to $400, but more extensive repairs or replacements may cost more. It is best to get a quote from a professional technician before proceeding with any repairs.

4. Is it worth repairing a rear-screen projection TV?

This ultimately depends on the age and condition of your TV, as well as the cost of the repairs. If your TV is relatively new and the repairs are less expensive than buying a new TV, it may be worth it to repair. However, if your TV is older or the repairs will cost more than a new TV, it may be more cost-effective to replace it.

5. How can I prevent future issues with my rear-screen projection TV?

To help prevent future issues with your rear-screen projection TV, make sure to properly maintain it by cleaning the screen and vents regularly, and avoiding placing it in direct sunlight or near sources of heat. It is also important to handle the TV carefully and avoid any physical damage. Consider investing in a surge protector to protect against power surges, which can damage the TV's components.

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