Electronics Resources for DIY Projects

  • Thread starter gleem
  • Start date

gleem

Science Advisor
Education Advisor
1,488
860
For those who might need a relatively simple electronic device for a project like relay control, frequency to voltage converters, voltage to current and current to voltage converter, small signal amplifiers, signal averaging and many others using cheap op-amps, I recommend

"How to Build and Use Electronic Devices Without Frustration, Panic, Mountains of Money or an Engineer Degree" by Stuart A. Hoenig.

It is dated (1980) but is great for learning how to use op-amps for a multitude of useful purposes in the various sciences. along with many useful tips. It has enough theory to get one up and running but not so much as to bog you down. It may still be in print although Amazon say it only has two in stock.
 
112
47
The following quote is from the tagged thread 3d printing resources in the mechanical engineering forum
I bought a fairly simple printer (TEVO Tarantrula) from AliExpress some time ago, it had some issues, but after a bit of patience and googling I have a device I'm quite happy with. As it came as a kit, I had to put it all together, and the devices themselves are really uncomplicated. Of course people far more talented than myself had already done all the hard work in terms of software, my unit uses "Marlin Firmware" (http://marlinfw.org/) which gets dumped on a Arduino based board and bobs your uncle. And after watching a few youtube videos, some of which were from this guy, (http://www.makersmuse.com/) I'm fairly comfortable with the whole thing.

In terms of CAD software, I use Fusion360 (https://www.autodesk.com/products/fusion-360/overview) it has a 30 day fee trial which can be made unlimited if you register as a hobbyist/enthusiast, it is an Autodesk product like TinkerCAD, but significantly more powerful, in my humble opinion.

If 3D design is not your bag, then (https://www.thingiverse.com/) has all sorts of objects you can just download, send to your slicing* program directly and print.


*Slicing programs are what takes your CAD designed masterpiece and chops it up into little layers that your 3D printing software can understand, i.e. boatloads of X,Y,Z co-ordinates.
3 major slicing programs I've come across are;
CURA (https://ultimaker.com/en/products/cura-software) which is free
SLIC3R (http://slic3r.org/download) which is also free, but was last updated in 2015, and we are still waiting for the April 2017 update
SIMPLFY3d (https://www.simplify3d.com/) which is less free at $150
I downloaded the Cura software, and fusion 360 and they both work great. When I downloaded fusion 360 my computer could not open it for a few hours after download so you may need to wait before being able to use it. For some reason it kept opening it in paint so if you have that issue don’t worry it will get fixed after some time.
 

gleem

Science Advisor
Education Advisor
1,488
860
Has anybody checked out Pinterest?
 

Related Threads for: Resources for DIY Projects

  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
444
  • Last Post
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
16
Views
936
Replies
3
Views
6K
Replies
7
Views
855
  • Last Post
2
Replies
29
Views
4K
Replies
14
Views
5K
Replies
7
Views
2K

Hot Threads

Top