Responding what when someone calls you

  • Thread starter WhiteTim
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  • #101
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??

Anyway, I also thank you Dave for your patience with me.

*blows out candle*

Oh, that part wasn't sarcasm. I was literally saying I am sure he is a reasonable person. I didn't literally mean he wasn't reasonable, I was exaggerating for effect. *shrug*

It seemed he was exaggerating the "dog feces = spit" part, so I decided to join in on the exaggeration.
 
  • #102
DaveC426913
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It seemed he was exaggerating the "dog feces = spit" part,
But I'm not saying they're equal I'm saying there is an inexorable slide down the slippery slope of what's tolerated. Today, dog poo is disgusting. Just as a decade or two ago, no one spat.

(Personally, I blame high-profile baseball pros and their wads of 'baccy.)
 
  • #103
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Just as a decade or two ago, no one spat.

I was alive both a decade and two ago, and plenty of people spat. I'm 26 now, and my mother yelled at me when I was approximately 4 or 5 for spitting. She claimed I was just emulating the teenagers next door. Therefore, two decades ago, the teenagers living next to me spat.

Fast forward to a decade ago. I was 16. I wasn't the only person spitting in public. It was fairly commonplace then, especially among smokers or people with a cold. I don't smoke, but constant sinus infections and allergies will have a similar effect.

Perhaps you meant 3 decades ago, I wasn't alive then, so I can't really refute your claims if you just push it back one more decade.
 
  • #104
lisab
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I was alive both a decade and two ago, and plenty of people spat. I'm 26 now, and my mother yelled at me when I was approximately 4 or 5 for spitting. She claimed I was just emulating the teenagers next door. Therefore, two decades ago, the teenagers living next to me spat.

Fast forward to a decade ago. I was 16. I wasn't the only person spitting in public. It was fairly commonplace then, especially among smokers or people with a cold. I don't smoke, but constant sinus infections and allergies will have a similar effect.

Perhaps you meant 3 decades ago, I wasn't alive then, so I can't really refute your claims if you just push it back one more decade.

Believe me, all this spitting really is fairly new. But maybe you grew up in the epicenter of this spitting craze, and so were exposed to it from an early age.

Seriously, it's your bodily waste, you should not dispose of it within sight of others. And you don't have to swallow it, that's what tissues are for. Some extremely low class people blow out their nostrils in public...omg, that's so, so, so disgusting. And just <that> far away from spitting, really, when you think about it.

Suppose you went over to your neighbor's house to talk to them about something, and in the middle of the conversation, you turned and spit on their porch. Now that's not polite, is it? You're thinking, of course not (I hope). It's rude. And if it's rude to spit on someone's porch, why is it OK to spit in a park? On a sidewalk? Anywhere where you share space with the public?
 
  • #105
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I see responding to being called by saying 'what' more like misusing who rather than whom in a sentence. I can understand if people don't appreciate it, but at least it won't make you ill or ruin your clothing. If throwing poo at each other is the custom of the day, then that's what it is. You might be able to convince people that it could make them sick. You could convince them that it will save them time and effort of cleaning their clothing. You can tell them that you don't appreciate it when they throw poo at you. I don't think anyone will be convinced that they should change their behaviour amongst their friends and peers because you don't approve of it personally.

There's a lot of straw in that poo. It suggests to me the belief that manners is equivalent to intelligence, and that without manners our ability to communicate is no better than a bunch of chimps who fling poo at each other because we are limited in our capacity for expression.

It's time for me to take a shower. I'm glad that custom is in fashion at the moment.
 
  • #106
Believe me, all this spitting really is fairly new.

That's odd. I've never known a time when it wasn't happening. And apparently back in the olden days bodily fluids in the streets was pretty common. I've often even still seen people urinating in public.
 
  • #107
DaveC426913
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I've often even still seen people urinating in public.
And is it then acceptable behavior?
 
  • #108
And is it then acceptable behavior?

I'm not arguing the acceptability. Only that there was a time when people didn't do these things.

We could go back to the matter of "What?" but I already decided we could argue that back and forth and be in the same place we are now. Its simply a matter of preference.
 
  • #109
BobG
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  • #110
Suppose you went over to your neighbor's house to talk to them about something, and in the middle of the conversation, you turned and spit on their porch. Now that's not polite, is it? You're thinking, of course not (I hope). It's rude. And if it's rude to spit on someone's porch, why is it OK to spit in a park? On a sidewalk? Anywhere where you share space with the public?
Nope, can't say I'd care. I wouldn't care if they spit on my porch either. The rain will wash it away, or it'll evaporate, or whatever. Either way I got better things to worry about.
 
  • #111
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Probably "What?" is short for "What's up?" which is what I always say in this situation. I try to convey by my tone of voice that I am genuinely interested in knowing what is up. I can't remember when I called out to someone and they responded "What?", but if they did, I obviously didn't get upset enough to remember it.
 
  • #112
Evo
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Nope, can't say I'd care. I wouldn't care if they spit on my porch either. The rain will wash it away, or it'll evaporate, or whatever. Either way I got better things to worry about.
Expectorating and deficating on areas which other people will walk and sit on and then carry that into their own homes where they are exposed to it is not only the epitome of rudeness, we're talking about spreading disease. Whether you personally approve of it is beside the point when it comes to impinging on other's rights. I can't believe anyone is defending this practice.
 
  • #113
DaveC426913
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Probably "What?" is short for "What's up?"
I insist that it is short for "What do you want?"
 
  • #114
DaveC426913
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Expectorating and deficating on areas which other people will walk and sit on and then carry that into their own homes where they are exposed to it is not only the epitome of rudeness, we're talking about spreading disease. Whether you personally approve of it is beside the point when it comes to impinging on other's rights. I can't believe anyone is defending this practice.
In his defense:
- as Huckleberry wittily said "There's a lot of straw in that poo." i.e. I've raised the stakes to spitting and poo in an attempt to illuminate the slippery slope of public manners. This was originally about saying 'what'.
- S&S is not defending it, he's merely saying he sets his "worry threshold" higher than spitting.

Still, I too find his indifference to someone spitting on his porch to be quite ... troubling. This starts down the road to other publicly-apathetic habits I see: littering, casual defacement or destruction of public property...
 
  • #116
tiny-tim
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No, he's on first.

That took a long time!!

111 posts and 11 days for someone with sufficient knowledge of the classics to be able to answer my question! :rolleyes:


o:) Who's on first? :confused:
 
  • #117
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Probably "What?" is short for "What's up?" which is what I always say in this situation.

If there were a shorthand version of "What's up?", it would be "What's?", not "What?" People don't say "What is up?"; they say "What's up" with the contraction.

Nobody responds "What's?" They say "What?"

Like Dave, I also insist that "What?" is short for "What do you want?"
 
  • #118
If there were a shorthand version of "What's up?", it would be "What's?", not "What?" People don't say "What is up?"; they say "What's up" with the contraction.

Nobody responds "What's?" They say "What?"

Like Dave, I also insist that "What?" is short for "What do you want?"

Just to be annoying I would like to point out that people do actually say "What up?" and I have heard the use of "Whut! Whuut!" ;-p
 
  • #119
Evo
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Just to be annoying I would like to point out that people do actually say "What up?" and I have heard the use of "Whut! Whuut!" ;-p
You know someone that says "what up"? Did you correct them?
 
  • #120
You know someone that says "what up"? Did you correct them?

Its far too common around here. If grammar were a topic of conversation though I would point it out in a heart beat. ;-)
 
  • #121
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You know someone that says "what up"? Did you correct them?

I went to a home improvement store over the weekend to price some building materials (starting another home improvement project that I'll undoubtedly need help to finish) and was greeted with a "Whut Uup" by the specialist.

I didn't correct him...but I did ask to speak to "the manager in charge". When the manager was summoned, she asked if there was a problem...and my response was NO...that I was considering a major purchase and wanted to speak with an adult.

They seemed to understand.
 
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