Returning to Physics: Study plan?

In summary, the conversation is about a mathematician who wants to re-learn physics after being away from the subject for several years. They are interested in classical physics, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. They are looking for an appropriate study plan and online program to help them refresh their knowledge. The suggestion is made to check out the Leonard Susskind online video series, "The Theoretical Minimum," which teaches upper level undergrad physics to those who have forgotten a lot of what they learned.
  • #1
Emir Shark
5
2
Hi all,

I am completely new to this forum. So allow me to introduce myself. I am currently paving my career as a mathematician, particularly in the field of probability theory and financial mathematics. I am currently pursuing a PhD in this subject and could not help but notice how closely related this field is to physics (i.e. statistical mechanics).

I have taken a few physics courses in the past and have always been fascinated by the subject. It has been a few years (probably 8 or 9 years) since I have taken a physics course. I have a soft spot for this subject and I although it is not related to my thesis, I would still like to learn it, out of passion and hopes that I can somehow apply it in my career one day.

My question is: is there a way I can re-learn physics? Keep in mind I am REALLY rusty and would probably need to go back to Square 1. Below is a break-down of what I have taken and what I am interested in.

Courses taken in the past:

Physics I : Newtonian mechanics, forces, .
Physics II: Wave mechanics, electromagnetism, oscillations, etc.
Modern Physics: Introduction to Special Relativity, Quantum Mechanics

What I am interested in:

Classical Physics
Electromagnetism
Relativity (Special & General)
Quantum Mechanics

I am particularly interested in the theoretical aspects of physics and I quite enjoy solving problems. Perhaps I need some suggestion on the following:

1. What is an appropriate study plan I can take with regards to course structure? Can I apply physics somehow in my research?

2. I don't want to just read textbooks. Can someone recommend some online program (not necessarily a degree) that I can pursue perhaps over the course of a year or so that can get me acquainted once again with these topics?

Thanks,

EM
 
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  • #2
I would look into the Leonard Susskind online video series The Theoretical Minimum where he tries to teach upper level undergrad physics to rusty folks who have an interest but who have forgotten a lot of what they learned.

You can find out more at his website:

http://theoreticalminimum.com/
 
  • #3
Thanks for the link! I think this is what I am looking for.
 

Related to Returning to Physics: Study plan?

1. What courses should I take in order to return to studying physics?

In order to return to studying physics, it is recommended to take courses in calculus, mechanics, electromagnetism, thermodynamics, and modern physics. These courses will provide a strong foundation for further studies in physics.

2. How can I refresh my knowledge of physics if it has been a long time since I last studied it?

One way to refresh your knowledge of physics is to review your old notes and textbooks. You can also watch online lectures or tutorials, or join a study group with other students who are also returning to studying physics.

3. Is it possible to study physics while working full-time?

Yes, it is possible to study physics while working full-time. It may require good time management skills and dedication, but with proper planning and organization, it can be done. Online courses or evening classes can also be a good option for those with busy schedules.

4. Do I need to have a strong math background to study physics?

Yes, a strong math background is crucial for studying physics. Calculus, algebra, and trigonometry are some of the key mathematical concepts used in physics. It is important to have a good understanding of these concepts in order to succeed in physics.

5. Are there any resources or tools that can help me with my studies?

Yes, there are many resources and tools available to help with studying physics. Some examples include textbooks, online lectures and tutorials, study groups, and physics-related software or apps. It is important to find the resources that work best for your learning style.

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